State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

New York City Water Summit (photos)

About 150 people attended the first New York City Water Summit on April 9th, which was organized by Professors William Becker and Kartik Chandran of the Columbia University Dept. of Earth and Environmental Engineering.

The morning sessions dealt with drinking water issues, while the afternoon sessions concentrated on wastewater treatment.  The event had a focus on New York City issues, but also looked at global perspectives and solutions.

Below are some photos of the day’s first speakers.

Kartik Chandran introduced Vice Dean Morton B. Friedman, the Opening Speaker
Kartik Chandran introduced Vice Dean Morton B. Friedman, the Opening Speaker
William Becker moderated the morning sessions
William Becker moderated the morning sessions
Water and Wastewater Issues Facing NYC Panel: James Roberts, Vincent Sapienza and James Mueller, Deputy Commissioners of NYC Department of Environmental Protectiton
Water and Wastewater Issues Facing NYC Panel: James Roberts, Vincent Sapienza and James Mueller, Deputy Commissioners of NYC Department of Environmental Protection
Part of NYC's Drinking Water Water Supply System
Part of NYC's Drinking Water Water Supply System
A diverse audience attended this innaugural summit
A diverse audience attended this inaugural summit

Follow the Columbia Water Center on Twitter:  http://twitter.com/columbiawater

Banner featuring a collage of extreme heat images.

Recent record-breaking heat waves have affected communities across the world. The Extreme Heat Workshop will bring together researchers and practitioners to advance the state of knowledge, identify community needs, and develop a framework for evaluating risks with a focus on climate justice. Register by June 15

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Kai
Kai
14 years ago

I was wondering if the PowerPoint presentations by the various speakers were going to be made available online? I believe there was mention of that during the conference.

Thank you.

arthur
arthur
14 years ago

Would also be interested in presentation material. Was the event taped? If so, will it be made available for viewing?

Glenn Martin
14 years ago

I see very little print or blog on the wastewater coming out of restaurants. This is a problem as most cities do not enforce their grease trap and grease interceptor by-laws. Most small restauarnts do not have their grease traps serviced on a timely basis thus allowing fat, oil and grease (fog) down the sewer. The longer a period the grease trap is serviced the more grease is going into the sewer. BOD Levels (biological oxygen demand) affects aquatic life. Grease Trap chemicals and enzymes are a band-aid fix to solve grease issues. This practice is pouring toxic chemicals into our water system. See http://www.greasetrap.ca