News from the Columbia Climate School

Author: David Funkhouser

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  • Banning Plastic Bags, Town by Town: a Guide

    Banning Plastic Bags, Town by Town: a Guide

    If you’re already doing your part to reduce, reuse and recycle, what more can you do? Start by thinking bigger, but not too big — one community at a time.

  • How Much Do Renewables Actually Depend on Tax Breaks?

    How Much Do Renewables Actually Depend on Tax Breaks?

    The shift to renewable energy is key to combating climate change and reducing our dependence on fossil fuels. But critics argue it won’t be possible without financial support from the government. How important are special tax breaks and other subsides, and do they really work?

  • Puerto Rico Faces a Long Road to a Sustainable Future

    Puerto Rico Faces a Long Road to a Sustainable Future

    Puerto Rico suffered an estimated $94 billion or more in damage, on top of an already sagging economy and $74 billion in debt. The island needs a total reboot. Can it do it sustainably?

  • Hannah Nissan: Forecasting Climate to Help Save Lives

    Hannah Nissan: Forecasting Climate to Help Save Lives

    Hannah Nissan, a postdoctoral research scientist at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society, studies how better climate forecasting might help reduce the number of deaths from heat waves and improve agriculture and child nutrition.

  • Jeffrey Shaman: What Makes the Flu Spread?

    Jeffrey Shaman: What Makes the Flu Spread?

    The onset of flu season each year comes as no surprise. But what is surprising is that we don’t know exactly how the flu spreads. Jeffrey Shaman is working on that.

  • Christine McCarthy: A Cheerleader for the Physics of Ice

    Christine McCarthy: A Cheerleader for the Physics of Ice

    Christine McCarthy, a geophysicist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, scrunches blocks of ice between hunks of rock to study how ice behaves under pressure. Her work provides an important piece of the puzzle of how glaciers move, what makes them speed up, and how they are contributing to sea level rise as the climate warms.

  • Adam Sobel: Preparing for the Next Big Storm

    Adam Sobel: Preparing for the Next Big Storm

    Superstorm Sandy was a wake-up call for a lot of people in New York City, including Adam Sobel, who’s spent more than two decades studying the physics of weather and climate.

  • Richard Seager Sees Hand of Climate Change in Drought

    Richard Seager Sees Hand of Climate Change in Drought

    California’s wet and snowy winter brings welcome relief from a years-long drought that has challenged the state’s water supply and agricultural system. But climate scientist Richard Seager of Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory offers words of caution: Remember what happened, because it will happen again.

  • Leymah Gbowee: Out of War, a Legacy of Building Peace

    Leymah Gbowee: Out of War, a Legacy of Building Peace

    Leymah Gbowee was 17 when war broke out in Liberia. Her experiences drove her onto a path of suffering, discovery and service that led to work rehabilitating child soldiers and helping build peace, village by village, in Liberia and eventually neighboring Sierra Leone.

  • Banning Plastic Bags, Town by Town: a Guide

    Banning Plastic Bags, Town by Town: a Guide

    If you’re already doing your part to reduce, reuse and recycle, what more can you do? Start by thinking bigger, but not too big — one community at a time.

  • How Much Do Renewables Actually Depend on Tax Breaks?

    How Much Do Renewables Actually Depend on Tax Breaks?

    The shift to renewable energy is key to combating climate change and reducing our dependence on fossil fuels. But critics argue it won’t be possible without financial support from the government. How important are special tax breaks and other subsides, and do they really work?

  • Puerto Rico Faces a Long Road to a Sustainable Future

    Puerto Rico Faces a Long Road to a Sustainable Future

    Puerto Rico suffered an estimated $94 billion or more in damage, on top of an already sagging economy and $74 billion in debt. The island needs a total reboot. Can it do it sustainably?

  • Hannah Nissan: Forecasting Climate to Help Save Lives

    Hannah Nissan: Forecasting Climate to Help Save Lives

    Hannah Nissan, a postdoctoral research scientist at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society, studies how better climate forecasting might help reduce the number of deaths from heat waves and improve agriculture and child nutrition.

  • Jeffrey Shaman: What Makes the Flu Spread?

    Jeffrey Shaman: What Makes the Flu Spread?

    The onset of flu season each year comes as no surprise. But what is surprising is that we don’t know exactly how the flu spreads. Jeffrey Shaman is working on that.

  • Christine McCarthy: A Cheerleader for the Physics of Ice

    Christine McCarthy: A Cheerleader for the Physics of Ice

    Christine McCarthy, a geophysicist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, scrunches blocks of ice between hunks of rock to study how ice behaves under pressure. Her work provides an important piece of the puzzle of how glaciers move, what makes them speed up, and how they are contributing to sea level rise as the climate warms.

  • Adam Sobel: Preparing for the Next Big Storm

    Adam Sobel: Preparing for the Next Big Storm

    Superstorm Sandy was a wake-up call for a lot of people in New York City, including Adam Sobel, who’s spent more than two decades studying the physics of weather and climate.

  • Richard Seager Sees Hand of Climate Change in Drought

    Richard Seager Sees Hand of Climate Change in Drought

    California’s wet and snowy winter brings welcome relief from a years-long drought that has challenged the state’s water supply and agricultural system. But climate scientist Richard Seager of Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory offers words of caution: Remember what happened, because it will happen again.

  • Leymah Gbowee: Out of War, a Legacy of Building Peace

    Leymah Gbowee: Out of War, a Legacy of Building Peace

    Leymah Gbowee was 17 when war broke out in Liberia. Her experiences drove her onto a path of suffering, discovery and service that led to work rehabilitating child soldiers and helping build peace, village by village, in Liberia and eventually neighboring Sierra Leone.