News from the Columbia Climate School

Author: Lakis Polycarpou

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  • America’s Dam Crisis: Was Oroville Just a Drop in the Bucket?

    America’s Dam Crisis: Was Oroville Just a Drop in the Bucket?

    Columbia Water Center experts argue that dam infrastructure issues must be connected to a broader conversation about America’s water resources.

  • Is Electricity Use in the Developing World About to Skyrocket?

    Is Electricity Use in the Developing World About to Skyrocket?

    Cities in the developing world may soon see dramatic spikes in electricity consumption for heating and cooling, according to a new study led by researchers from the Earth Institute’s Quadracci Sustainable Engineering Lab.

  • Flint Crisis Opens Door on Water Problems Around U.S.

    Flint Crisis Opens Door on Water Problems Around U.S.

    Experts from the Columbia Water Center, the Earth Institute and affiliates talk about the municipal water crisis in Flint, Mich., the nature of the crisis and what it means for America’s Water.

  • With El Niño, Be Careful What You Wish for

    With El Niño, Be Careful What You Wish for

    In Southern California, a strong El Niño usually signals rain. Given that California is now in the throes of a severe drought, it seems like that should be a good thing, even if it comes with risk of floods. But the reality of climate is more complex and counter-intuitive than it first appears.

  • Learning from a River’s History to Prepare for the Future

    Learning from a River’s History to Prepare for the Future

    Researchers from eight universities, including Columbia University, are using tree ring and glacier analysis to reconstruct the climate history of the Missouri River Basin in order to give policymakers and water managers better decision-making tools to manage the river.

  • U.S. Drought Risk Wider than Previously Thought

    U.S. Drought Risk Wider than Previously Thought

    New research from the Columbia Water Center suggests that many more places in the United States are at risk of drought-induced water stress than is commonly thought, including dense metropolitan regions such as New York City and Washington, D.C.

  • Waking up to America’s Water Challenges

    Waking up to America’s Water Challenges

    “Will it take another Dustbowl for Americans to start paying attention to water issues?” asked Water Center Director Upmanu Lall. Or will it be the chance to create the “iPhone technology” of water? Whether the impetus is crisis or opportunity, according to Lall, the time to act is now.

  • Floods, Companies and Supply Chain Risk

    Floods, Companies and Supply Chain Risk

    Global companies with long supply chains could do a much better job of managing climate disaster risk, according to a recently published study from the Columbia Water Center.

  • How Much Arsenic is Too Little?

    How Much Arsenic is Too Little?

    Five hundred utilities in the U.S. provide drinking water with unsafe levels of arsenic, the Environmental Protection Agency says. But how many people are getting too much arsenic in their water is much less clear, according to a study conducted in part by the Columbia Water Center.

  • America’s Dam Crisis: Was Oroville Just a Drop in the Bucket?

    America’s Dam Crisis: Was Oroville Just a Drop in the Bucket?

    Columbia Water Center experts argue that dam infrastructure issues must be connected to a broader conversation about America’s water resources.

  • Is Electricity Use in the Developing World About to Skyrocket?

    Is Electricity Use in the Developing World About to Skyrocket?

    Cities in the developing world may soon see dramatic spikes in electricity consumption for heating and cooling, according to a new study led by researchers from the Earth Institute’s Quadracci Sustainable Engineering Lab.

  • Flint Crisis Opens Door on Water Problems Around U.S.

    Flint Crisis Opens Door on Water Problems Around U.S.

    Experts from the Columbia Water Center, the Earth Institute and affiliates talk about the municipal water crisis in Flint, Mich., the nature of the crisis and what it means for America’s Water.

  • With El Niño, Be Careful What You Wish for

    With El Niño, Be Careful What You Wish for

    In Southern California, a strong El Niño usually signals rain. Given that California is now in the throes of a severe drought, it seems like that should be a good thing, even if it comes with risk of floods. But the reality of climate is more complex and counter-intuitive than it first appears.

  • Learning from a River’s History to Prepare for the Future

    Learning from a River’s History to Prepare for the Future

    Researchers from eight universities, including Columbia University, are using tree ring and glacier analysis to reconstruct the climate history of the Missouri River Basin in order to give policymakers and water managers better decision-making tools to manage the river.

  • U.S. Drought Risk Wider than Previously Thought

    U.S. Drought Risk Wider than Previously Thought

    New research from the Columbia Water Center suggests that many more places in the United States are at risk of drought-induced water stress than is commonly thought, including dense metropolitan regions such as New York City and Washington, D.C.

  • Waking up to America’s Water Challenges

    Waking up to America’s Water Challenges

    “Will it take another Dustbowl for Americans to start paying attention to water issues?” asked Water Center Director Upmanu Lall. Or will it be the chance to create the “iPhone technology” of water? Whether the impetus is crisis or opportunity, according to Lall, the time to act is now.

  • Floods, Companies and Supply Chain Risk

    Floods, Companies and Supply Chain Risk

    Global companies with long supply chains could do a much better job of managing climate disaster risk, according to a recently published study from the Columbia Water Center.

  • How Much Arsenic is Too Little?

    How Much Arsenic is Too Little?

    Five hundred utilities in the U.S. provide drinking water with unsafe levels of arsenic, the Environmental Protection Agency says. But how many people are getting too much arsenic in their water is much less clear, according to a study conducted in part by the Columbia Water Center.