State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

Tag: Arabian Sea

  • Studying Bioluminescent Blooms in the Arabian Sea

    Studying Bioluminescent Blooms in the Arabian Sea

    A plankton-like species is attacking the base of the food chain in the Arabian sea, disrupting water quality and killing fish. Researchers at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory are learning how to fight back.

  • Rapid-Fire Cyclones over the North Indian Ocean

    Rapid-Fire Cyclones over the North Indian Ocean

    With Chapala’s destructive landfall in Yemen just a couple of days in the past, a second tropical cyclone, Megh, has just formed in the Arabian Sea. This one is not forecast to become anywhere near as intense as Chapala did—though we know intensity forecasts can be wrong, as they were at early stages for both…

  • An Algorithm to Investigate Unwelcome Plankton

    An Algorithm to Investigate Unwelcome Plankton

    Computer scientists at Columbia University will work with oceanographers to understand what has caused an unusual plankton-like species to rapidly invade the Arabian Sea food chain, threatening fisheries that sustain more than 100 million people.

Science for the Planet: In these short video explainers, discover how scientists and scholars across the Columbia Climate School are working to understand the effects of climate change and help solve the crisis.
  • Studying Bioluminescent Blooms in the Arabian Sea

    Studying Bioluminescent Blooms in the Arabian Sea

    A plankton-like species is attacking the base of the food chain in the Arabian sea, disrupting water quality and killing fish. Researchers at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory are learning how to fight back.

  • Rapid-Fire Cyclones over the North Indian Ocean

    Rapid-Fire Cyclones over the North Indian Ocean

    With Chapala’s destructive landfall in Yemen just a couple of days in the past, a second tropical cyclone, Megh, has just formed in the Arabian Sea. This one is not forecast to become anywhere near as intense as Chapala did—though we know intensity forecasts can be wrong, as they were at early stages for both…

  • An Algorithm to Investigate Unwelcome Plankton

    An Algorithm to Investigate Unwelcome Plankton

    Computer scientists at Columbia University will work with oceanographers to understand what has caused an unusual plankton-like species to rapidly invade the Arabian Sea food chain, threatening fisheries that sustain more than 100 million people.