State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

Big Data

  • Harnessing Big Data and Machine Learning to Forecast Wildfires in the Western U.S.

    Harnessing Big Data and Machine Learning to Forecast Wildfires in the Western U.S.

    New research will advance understanding of how wildfires may evolve in the future, and how we can most effectively respond to them.

  • Machine Listening for Earthquakes

    Machine Listening for Earthquakes

    In a new study, researchers show that machine learning algorithms can pick out different types of earthquakes from three years of data at Geysers in California. The repeating patterns of earthquakes appear to match the seasonal rise and fall of water-injection flows into the hot rocks below.

  • ‘Pangeo’ Project Will Improve Access to Climate Data

    ‘Pangeo’ Project Will Improve Access to Climate Data

    The better climate models become, the harder it is to use them. One team of researchers is working to fix that.

  • IEDA: Revolutionizing Big Data

    IEDA: Revolutionizing Big Data

    The Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance is fueling groundbreaking multi-disciplinary discoveries worldwide. “This is a new era of data mining,” says IEDA Director Kerstin Lehnert, a geochemist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

  • New Group Takes On Massive Computing Needs of Big Data

    New Group Takes On Massive Computing Needs of Big Data

    The sheer number of observations now streaming from land, sea, air and space has outpaced the ability of most computers to process it. The Data Science Institute’s newest working group —Frontiers in Computing Systems—will try to address some of the bottlenecks facing scientists working with these and other massive data sets.

  • Science Journalists and the Data Revolution

    Science Journalists and the Data Revolution

    Journalist Cheryl Philips described using publicly accessible records of infrastructure assessments done by the Department of Transportation in Washington State to map the most vulnerable bridges and to tell the story behind a bridge that collapsed, killing several people. John Bohannon of Science Magazine used iPython coding to send a fake journal article to close…

  • Contest Aims to Bring ‘Dark Data’ into Digital Archives

    Contest Aims to Bring ‘Dark Data’ into Digital Archives

    The scientific publisher Elsevier and a data archiving facility at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory are offering $5,000 and a trophy to the person with the best example of how data-preservation techniques are being used to advance new discoveries in the earth sciences.

Banner featuring a collage of extreme heat images.

Recent record-breaking heat waves have affected communities across the world. The Extreme Heat Workshop will bring together researchers and practitioners to advance the state of knowledge, identify community needs, and develop a framework for evaluating risks with a focus on climate justice. Register by June 15

  • Harnessing Big Data and Machine Learning to Forecast Wildfires in the Western U.S.

    Harnessing Big Data and Machine Learning to Forecast Wildfires in the Western U.S.

    New research will advance understanding of how wildfires may evolve in the future, and how we can most effectively respond to them.

  • Machine Listening for Earthquakes

    Machine Listening for Earthquakes

    In a new study, researchers show that machine learning algorithms can pick out different types of earthquakes from three years of data at Geysers in California. The repeating patterns of earthquakes appear to match the seasonal rise and fall of water-injection flows into the hot rocks below.

  • ‘Pangeo’ Project Will Improve Access to Climate Data

    ‘Pangeo’ Project Will Improve Access to Climate Data

    The better climate models become, the harder it is to use them. One team of researchers is working to fix that.

  • IEDA: Revolutionizing Big Data

    IEDA: Revolutionizing Big Data

    The Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance is fueling groundbreaking multi-disciplinary discoveries worldwide. “This is a new era of data mining,” says IEDA Director Kerstin Lehnert, a geochemist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

  • New Group Takes On Massive Computing Needs of Big Data

    New Group Takes On Massive Computing Needs of Big Data

    The sheer number of observations now streaming from land, sea, air and space has outpaced the ability of most computers to process it. The Data Science Institute’s newest working group —Frontiers in Computing Systems—will try to address some of the bottlenecks facing scientists working with these and other massive data sets.

  • Science Journalists and the Data Revolution

    Science Journalists and the Data Revolution

    Journalist Cheryl Philips described using publicly accessible records of infrastructure assessments done by the Department of Transportation in Washington State to map the most vulnerable bridges and to tell the story behind a bridge that collapsed, killing several people. John Bohannon of Science Magazine used iPython coding to send a fake journal article to close…

  • Contest Aims to Bring ‘Dark Data’ into Digital Archives

    Contest Aims to Bring ‘Dark Data’ into Digital Archives

    The scientific publisher Elsevier and a data archiving facility at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory are offering $5,000 and a trophy to the person with the best example of how data-preservation techniques are being used to advance new discoveries in the earth sciences.