State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

boreal forests

  • Photo Essay: Where the Trees Meet the Tundra

    Photo Essay: Where the Trees Meet the Tundra

    Due to warming climate and increasing human exploitation, far northern forests and the tundra beyond are undergoing rapid changes. In northern Alaska, scientists from Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and other institutions are studying the responses of trees at the very edge of their range.

  • Meet Pepperoni the Robin, and Friends

    Meet Pepperoni the Robin, and Friends

    Natalie Boelman and colleagues are tagging American robins near Slave Lake, Alberta, Canada, as the birds migrate north to nesting grounds. In a recent blog post for NASA, she put up videos about their work. You can watch some of them below, or go to the blog page at NASA’s Earth Observatory to see and…

  • Migration Mysteries of the American Robin

    Migration Mysteries of the American Robin

    Ecologist Natalie Boelman is headed back to the far north to study birds—this time to the town of Slave Lake, in northern Alberta, Canada, to track the migration of American robins. She will have some schoolchildren in New York remotely helping her as she and her colleagues get to work.

  • Canadian Boreal: Protecting Today’s Water for Tomorrow

    Canadian Boreal: Protecting Today’s Water for Tomorrow

    Canada’s Boreal forest is far from the public eye, but it contains 25 percent of the world’s wetlands.

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Recent record-breaking heat waves have affected communities across the world. The Extreme Heat Workshop will bring together researchers and practitioners to advance the state of knowledge, identify community needs, and develop a framework for evaluating risks with a focus on climate justice. Register by June 15

  • Photo Essay: Where the Trees Meet the Tundra

    Photo Essay: Where the Trees Meet the Tundra

    Due to warming climate and increasing human exploitation, far northern forests and the tundra beyond are undergoing rapid changes. In northern Alaska, scientists from Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and other institutions are studying the responses of trees at the very edge of their range.

  • Meet Pepperoni the Robin, and Friends

    Meet Pepperoni the Robin, and Friends

    Natalie Boelman and colleagues are tagging American robins near Slave Lake, Alberta, Canada, as the birds migrate north to nesting grounds. In a recent blog post for NASA, she put up videos about their work. You can watch some of them below, or go to the blog page at NASA’s Earth Observatory to see and…

  • Migration Mysteries of the American Robin

    Migration Mysteries of the American Robin

    Ecologist Natalie Boelman is headed back to the far north to study birds—this time to the town of Slave Lake, in northern Alberta, Canada, to track the migration of American robins. She will have some schoolchildren in New York remotely helping her as she and her colleagues get to work.

  • Canadian Boreal: Protecting Today’s Water for Tomorrow

    Canadian Boreal: Protecting Today’s Water for Tomorrow

    Canada’s Boreal forest is far from the public eye, but it contains 25 percent of the world’s wetlands.