News from the Columbia Climate School

Tag: crowdsourcing

  • Citizen Scientists Can Help Predict and Prepare for Disasters

    Citizen Scientists Can Help Predict and Prepare for Disasters

    A recent study finds that you don’t need to be an expert to gather information that aids disaster prediction and response.

  • Track Mosquitoes with your Smartphone

    Track Mosquitoes with your Smartphone

    Using crowd-sourced data, the Bitebytes app can educate the public on mosquitoes, the diseases they transmit, and mosquito habitat control, while allowing cities to target key areas to help control the potential for the spread of mosquito-borne diseases.

  • Illuminating the Science: Art and Climate Change Part II

    Last week I expressed some skepticism that art and climate science were complementary languages. I also expressed some hope that the nature of these two fields – that is, that they both are ways of better knowing the world – really were reconcilable, and could create a better robustness of understanding the natural world. I’m glad…

Science for the Planet: In these short video explainers, discover how scientists and scholars across the Columbia Climate School are working to understand the effects of climate change and help solve the crisis.
  • Citizen Scientists Can Help Predict and Prepare for Disasters

    Citizen Scientists Can Help Predict and Prepare for Disasters

    A recent study finds that you don’t need to be an expert to gather information that aids disaster prediction and response.

  • Track Mosquitoes with your Smartphone

    Track Mosquitoes with your Smartphone

    Using crowd-sourced data, the Bitebytes app can educate the public on mosquitoes, the diseases they transmit, and mosquito habitat control, while allowing cities to target key areas to help control the potential for the spread of mosquito-borne diseases.

  • Illuminating the Science: Art and Climate Change Part II

    Last week I expressed some skepticism that art and climate science were complementary languages. I also expressed some hope that the nature of these two fields – that is, that they both are ways of better knowing the world – really were reconcilable, and could create a better robustness of understanding the natural world. I’m glad…