State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

deforestation2

  • Colombian Youth Sue for Recognition of the Rights of Future Generations

    Colombian Youth Sue for Recognition of the Rights of Future Generations

    A group of 25 children and young adults are suing the Colombian government, demanding the protection of their constitutional rights to health, food, water, and a healthy environment.

  • Palm Oil in the Amazon: Threat or Opportunity?

    Palm Oil in the Amazon: Threat or Opportunity?

    Small migratory farming is responsible for 70% of the annual deforestation in Peru. Can palm oil address this problem and lead the change towards sustainable development in the Peruvian Amazon?

  • Toward a Carbon-Neutral Future: Why Land and Resource Rights Matter

    Toward a Carbon-Neutral Future: Why Land and Resource Rights Matter

    Climate change is a destabilizing force that touches all sectors of society, whether agriculture, forestry, infrastructure, energy, water or health. The inherently intertwined and complex nature of climate change impacts means that strong institutions, laws and policies are critical to ensuring that these impacts don’t impinge on the rights of local populations. Key among these…

  • Protecting Indigenous Land Rights Makes Good Economic Sense

    Protecting Indigenous Land Rights Makes Good Economic Sense

    Indigenous peoples and other communities hold and manage 50 to 65 percent of the world’s land, yet governments recognize only 10 percent as legally belonging to these groups, with another 8 percent designated by governments for communities. That’s bad economic policy.

  • Making Progress on Deforestation

    Making Progress on Deforestation

    In 2005, Brazil was losing more forest each year than any other country. Today, Brazil has reduced deforestation in the Amazon by 70 percent. Seventeen countries across four continents have also shown progress in reducing tropical deforestation. But there is still a long way to go.

  • In Haiti, Exploring What Drives People to Alter the Landscape

    In Haiti, Exploring What Drives People to Alter the Landscape

    Study of the Pedernales Watershed, located along Haiti’s southern national boundary with the Dominican Republic, may provide insights into the stark contrast in land cover patterns between the two countries.

  • Haiti’s Charcoal Challenge

    Haiti’s Charcoal Challenge

    Three Columbia University graduate students recently spent a week in Haiti trying to understand the nuances of the charcoal production process. The study site was in the Port-à-Piment watershed of the South Department where local people are on the front lines of climate, agricultural, and water challenges.

  • Climate News Roundup – Week of 3/21

    Progress Seen on Forest Scheme, Tehran Times Germany joins a 60-country and multi-billion dollar effort to stave deforestation in developing and tropical countries. The plan was initially discussed during the Copenhagen summit this December. However, the details were finally fleshed out Thursday at an all-day conference in Paris, where representatives gathered to decide how to…

  • Urbanization, Deforestation, Reforestation

    2009 was noted as the first year that more people lived in urban spaces than in rural areas.  The hope that a majority urban population would slow the clearing of tropical forests — our most effective carbon sinks — seems, however, to have been misplaced. The idea was simple: if more people moved into forested…

Banner featuring a collage of extreme heat images.

Recent record-breaking heat waves have affected communities across the world. The Extreme Heat Workshop will bring together researchers and practitioners to advance the state of knowledge, identify community needs, and develop a framework for evaluating risks with a focus on climate justice. Register by June 15

  • Colombian Youth Sue for Recognition of the Rights of Future Generations

    Colombian Youth Sue for Recognition of the Rights of Future Generations

    A group of 25 children and young adults are suing the Colombian government, demanding the protection of their constitutional rights to health, food, water, and a healthy environment.

  • Palm Oil in the Amazon: Threat or Opportunity?

    Palm Oil in the Amazon: Threat or Opportunity?

    Small migratory farming is responsible for 70% of the annual deforestation in Peru. Can palm oil address this problem and lead the change towards sustainable development in the Peruvian Amazon?

  • Toward a Carbon-Neutral Future: Why Land and Resource Rights Matter

    Toward a Carbon-Neutral Future: Why Land and Resource Rights Matter

    Climate change is a destabilizing force that touches all sectors of society, whether agriculture, forestry, infrastructure, energy, water or health. The inherently intertwined and complex nature of climate change impacts means that strong institutions, laws and policies are critical to ensuring that these impacts don’t impinge on the rights of local populations. Key among these…

  • Protecting Indigenous Land Rights Makes Good Economic Sense

    Protecting Indigenous Land Rights Makes Good Economic Sense

    Indigenous peoples and other communities hold and manage 50 to 65 percent of the world’s land, yet governments recognize only 10 percent as legally belonging to these groups, with another 8 percent designated by governments for communities. That’s bad economic policy.

  • Making Progress on Deforestation

    Making Progress on Deforestation

    In 2005, Brazil was losing more forest each year than any other country. Today, Brazil has reduced deforestation in the Amazon by 70 percent. Seventeen countries across four continents have also shown progress in reducing tropical deforestation. But there is still a long way to go.

  • In Haiti, Exploring What Drives People to Alter the Landscape

    In Haiti, Exploring What Drives People to Alter the Landscape

    Study of the Pedernales Watershed, located along Haiti’s southern national boundary with the Dominican Republic, may provide insights into the stark contrast in land cover patterns between the two countries.

  • Haiti’s Charcoal Challenge

    Haiti’s Charcoal Challenge

    Three Columbia University graduate students recently spent a week in Haiti trying to understand the nuances of the charcoal production process. The study site was in the Port-à-Piment watershed of the South Department where local people are on the front lines of climate, agricultural, and water challenges.

  • Climate News Roundup – Week of 3/21

    Progress Seen on Forest Scheme, Tehran Times Germany joins a 60-country and multi-billion dollar effort to stave deforestation in developing and tropical countries. The plan was initially discussed during the Copenhagen summit this December. However, the details were finally fleshed out Thursday at an all-day conference in Paris, where representatives gathered to decide how to…

  • Urbanization, Deforestation, Reforestation

    2009 was noted as the first year that more people lived in urban spaces than in rural areas.  The hope that a majority urban population would slow the clearing of tropical forests — our most effective carbon sinks — seems, however, to have been misplaced. The idea was simple: if more people moved into forested…