News from the Columbia Climate School

Tag: geophysics

  • With Drones, Geophysics and ArtificiaI Intelligence, Researchers Prepare to Do Battle Against Land Mines

    With Drones, Geophysics and ArtificiaI Intelligence, Researchers Prepare to Do Battle Against Land Mines

    Finding land mines the old-fashioned way—on foot, with a metal detector—is agonizingly slow and dangerous. Scientists are working to make the process faster and safer.

  • Vetlesen Prize Ceremony Honors Two Distinguished Researchers in Earth Sciences

    Vetlesen Prize Ceremony Honors Two Distinguished Researchers in Earth Sciences

    A celebration held at Columbia University recognized scientists Anny Cazenave and David Kohlstedt as the 2020 and 2023 Vetlesen Prize recipients.

  • Q&A With French Geophysicist and 2020 Vetlesen Prize Winner Anny Cazenave

    Q&A With French Geophysicist and 2020 Vetlesen Prize Winner Anny Cazenave

    For the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, world-renowned geophysicist Anny Cazenave discusses her research journey, the Vetlesen Prize, and her hopes for younger women scientists entering the field.

  • Harnessing Drones, Geophysics and Artificial Intelligence to Root Out Land Mines

    Harnessing Drones, Geophysics and Artificial Intelligence to Root Out Land Mines

    A grad student and his colleagues search for innovative new ways to detect and disarm millions of hidden hazards.

  • Christine McCarthy: A Cheerleader for the Physics of Ice

    Christine McCarthy: A Cheerleader for the Physics of Ice

    Christine McCarthy, a geophysicist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, scrunches blocks of ice between hunks of rock to study how ice behaves under pressure. Her work provides an important piece of the puzzle of how glaciers move, what makes them speed up, and how they are contributing to sea level rise as the climate warms.

  • The Downs and Ups of Mountain Building

    The Downs and Ups of Mountain Building

    In the islands off Papua New Guinea, the rocks are giving rise to new ideas about the ways mountain chains form. A new scientific model shows how two seemingly opposite processes can take place in the same region.

  • Smooth Sailing Back to Tasmania

    Smooth Sailing Back to Tasmania

    After a surprisingly smooth crossing of the Southern Ocean, with favorable winds we arrived back in Hobart, Tasmania. The weather maps show that we just got ahead of another big storm system.

  • Taking a 4,000-Meter-Deep Profile of Antarctic Waters

    Taking a 4,000-Meter-Deep Profile of Antarctic Waters

    In addition to understanding potential pathways for “warmer” circumpolar deep water to reach the ice shelf, we are also measuring what the structure and properties of the water column are and determining if there is already warmer water on or near the continental shelf that could already interact with the glaciers of East Antarctica today.

  • Mapping the Seafloor

    Mapping the Seafloor

    One of the goals of this expedition is to investigate if water from the Southern Ocean with temperatures above the melting point of glaciers could reach the glaciers in East Antarctica, and if there are any obstacles on the seafloor of the shelf that impact the ability of such water to reach the glaciers and…

Science for the Planet: In these short video explainers, discover how scientists and scholars across the Columbia Climate School are working to understand the effects of climate change and help solve the crisis.
  • With Drones, Geophysics and ArtificiaI Intelligence, Researchers Prepare to Do Battle Against Land Mines

    With Drones, Geophysics and ArtificiaI Intelligence, Researchers Prepare to Do Battle Against Land Mines

    Finding land mines the old-fashioned way—on foot, with a metal detector—is agonizingly slow and dangerous. Scientists are working to make the process faster and safer.

  • Vetlesen Prize Ceremony Honors Two Distinguished Researchers in Earth Sciences

    Vetlesen Prize Ceremony Honors Two Distinguished Researchers in Earth Sciences

    A celebration held at Columbia University recognized scientists Anny Cazenave and David Kohlstedt as the 2020 and 2023 Vetlesen Prize recipients.

  • Q&A With French Geophysicist and 2020 Vetlesen Prize Winner Anny Cazenave

    Q&A With French Geophysicist and 2020 Vetlesen Prize Winner Anny Cazenave

    For the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, world-renowned geophysicist Anny Cazenave discusses her research journey, the Vetlesen Prize, and her hopes for younger women scientists entering the field.

  • Harnessing Drones, Geophysics and Artificial Intelligence to Root Out Land Mines

    Harnessing Drones, Geophysics and Artificial Intelligence to Root Out Land Mines

    A grad student and his colleagues search for innovative new ways to detect and disarm millions of hidden hazards.

  • Christine McCarthy: A Cheerleader for the Physics of Ice

    Christine McCarthy: A Cheerleader for the Physics of Ice

    Christine McCarthy, a geophysicist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, scrunches blocks of ice between hunks of rock to study how ice behaves under pressure. Her work provides an important piece of the puzzle of how glaciers move, what makes them speed up, and how they are contributing to sea level rise as the climate warms.

  • The Downs and Ups of Mountain Building

    The Downs and Ups of Mountain Building

    In the islands off Papua New Guinea, the rocks are giving rise to new ideas about the ways mountain chains form. A new scientific model shows how two seemingly opposite processes can take place in the same region.

  • Smooth Sailing Back to Tasmania

    Smooth Sailing Back to Tasmania

    After a surprisingly smooth crossing of the Southern Ocean, with favorable winds we arrived back in Hobart, Tasmania. The weather maps show that we just got ahead of another big storm system.

  • Taking a 4,000-Meter-Deep Profile of Antarctic Waters

    Taking a 4,000-Meter-Deep Profile of Antarctic Waters

    In addition to understanding potential pathways for “warmer” circumpolar deep water to reach the ice shelf, we are also measuring what the structure and properties of the water column are and determining if there is already warmer water on or near the continental shelf that could already interact with the glaciers of East Antarctica today.

  • Mapping the Seafloor

    Mapping the Seafloor

    One of the goals of this expedition is to investigate if water from the Southern Ocean with temperatures above the melting point of glaciers could reach the glaciers in East Antarctica, and if there are any obstacles on the seafloor of the shelf that impact the ability of such water to reach the glaciers and…