State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

Mountain building

  • Climate Change and Glaciers Affect Mountain-Building in Patagonia

    Climate Change and Glaciers Affect Mountain-Building in Patagonia

    Extensive field work in Patagonia confirms the theory that climate change and glaciers can affect the forces inside the Earth that build mountains.

  • The Downs and Ups of Mountain Building

    The Downs and Ups of Mountain Building

    In the islands off Papua New Guinea, the rocks are giving rise to new ideas about the ways mountain chains form. A new scientific model shows how two seemingly opposite processes can take place in the same region.

  • Photo Essay: Norwegian Rocks

    Photo Essay: Norwegian Rocks

    Geologist John Templeton recently spent a year on Norway’s west coast trying to understand how rocks now at the surface made an epic journey deep into Earth’s interior and back during the growth and subsequent collapse of the ancient Caledonian mountains. Check out a photo essay describing his work.

Columbia campus skyline with text Columbia Climate School Class Day 2024 - Congratulations Graduates

Congratulations to our Columbia Climate School MA in Climate & Society Class of 2024! Learn about our May 10 Class Day celebration. #ColumbiaClimate2024

  • Climate Change and Glaciers Affect Mountain-Building in Patagonia

    Climate Change and Glaciers Affect Mountain-Building in Patagonia

    Extensive field work in Patagonia confirms the theory that climate change and glaciers can affect the forces inside the Earth that build mountains.

  • The Downs and Ups of Mountain Building

    The Downs and Ups of Mountain Building

    In the islands off Papua New Guinea, the rocks are giving rise to new ideas about the ways mountain chains form. A new scientific model shows how two seemingly opposite processes can take place in the same region.

  • Photo Essay: Norwegian Rocks

    Photo Essay: Norwegian Rocks

    Geologist John Templeton recently spent a year on Norway’s west coast trying to understand how rocks now at the surface made an epic journey deep into Earth’s interior and back during the growth and subsequent collapse of the ancient Caledonian mountains. Check out a photo essay describing his work.