State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

Paris climate accord

  • Implications of Leaving Paris More Intricate Than You Think

    Implications of Leaving Paris More Intricate Than You Think

    The implications of withdrawal are more intricate than what people have been fixating on so far.

  • Climate Change Under Trump:    A Q&A with Michael Gerrard

    Climate Change Under Trump: A Q&A with Michael Gerrard

    For those who favor strong action on climate change, the election of Donald Trump is creating plenty of anxiety and concern. Will Trump set our efforts to curb climate change back? How can those who are concerned about climate change best fight back?

  • Stranding Equitably in the Current Market and Geopolitical Context

    Stranding Equitably in the Current Market and Geopolitical Context

    The Columbia Center on Sustainable Investment’s conference of early November will consider, notably, how world production of oil and gas could be significantly reduced in manners protecting the interests of lower-income producing countries, given that staying on carbon budget will require leaving two thirds of our fossil fuel reserves unburnt.

  • Shareholders Turn Up the Heat on Climate Change

    Shareholders Turn Up the Heat on Climate Change

    2016 was a hot year for climate change shareholder resolutions hitting the boardrooms of oil and gas companies. Although more familiar climate news headlines have carried calls to “keep it in the ground” and divest investment portfolios from fossil fuels, a patient strategy has been quietly gaining momentum: shareholder engagement on climate change.

  • Trump vs. Clinton: What the Election Could Mean for Climate Policy

    Trump vs. Clinton: What the Election Could Mean for Climate Policy

    The outcome of this year’s presidential election could have far-reaching implications for the fate of our planet because the two presumptive candidates, Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump, have very different ideas about climate change. What will they do about the Paris accord and climate change?

  • Electoral Politics and Environmental Sustainability

    The political consensus for sustainability that could emerge might be based on increased funding for the science of renewable energy, battery technology, energy efficiency and smart grids. It could also include incentives for private sector investment to commercialize new energy technologies, and tax expenditures that make it easier for consumers to adopt these new technologies.

  • Growing the Global Economy Without Destroying the Planet

    We need to focus our attention on the existing systems of management and influence now in place and attempt to turn them toward sustainability. This includes national, state and especially local governments, corporations and nonprofit organizations.

Banner featuring a collage of extreme heat images.

Recent record-breaking heat waves have affected communities across the world. The Extreme Heat Workshop will bring together researchers and practitioners to advance the state of knowledge, identify community needs, and develop a framework for evaluating risks with a focus on climate justice. Register by June 15

  • Implications of Leaving Paris More Intricate Than You Think

    Implications of Leaving Paris More Intricate Than You Think

    The implications of withdrawal are more intricate than what people have been fixating on so far.

  • Climate Change Under Trump:    A Q&A with Michael Gerrard

    Climate Change Under Trump: A Q&A with Michael Gerrard

    For those who favor strong action on climate change, the election of Donald Trump is creating plenty of anxiety and concern. Will Trump set our efforts to curb climate change back? How can those who are concerned about climate change best fight back?

  • Stranding Equitably in the Current Market and Geopolitical Context

    Stranding Equitably in the Current Market and Geopolitical Context

    The Columbia Center on Sustainable Investment’s conference of early November will consider, notably, how world production of oil and gas could be significantly reduced in manners protecting the interests of lower-income producing countries, given that staying on carbon budget will require leaving two thirds of our fossil fuel reserves unburnt.

  • Shareholders Turn Up the Heat on Climate Change

    Shareholders Turn Up the Heat on Climate Change

    2016 was a hot year for climate change shareholder resolutions hitting the boardrooms of oil and gas companies. Although more familiar climate news headlines have carried calls to “keep it in the ground” and divest investment portfolios from fossil fuels, a patient strategy has been quietly gaining momentum: shareholder engagement on climate change.

  • Trump vs. Clinton: What the Election Could Mean for Climate Policy

    Trump vs. Clinton: What the Election Could Mean for Climate Policy

    The outcome of this year’s presidential election could have far-reaching implications for the fate of our planet because the two presumptive candidates, Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump, have very different ideas about climate change. What will they do about the Paris accord and climate change?

  • Electoral Politics and Environmental Sustainability

    The political consensus for sustainability that could emerge might be based on increased funding for the science of renewable energy, battery technology, energy efficiency and smart grids. It could also include incentives for private sector investment to commercialize new energy technologies, and tax expenditures that make it easier for consumers to adopt these new technologies.

  • Growing the Global Economy Without Destroying the Planet

    We need to focus our attention on the existing systems of management and influence now in place and attempt to turn them toward sustainability. This includes national, state and especially local governments, corporations and nonprofit organizations.