State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

plankton

  • Plankton Are Central to Life on Earth. How Is Climate Change Affecting Them?

    Plankton Are Central to Life on Earth. How Is Climate Change Affecting Them?

    Plankton play many important roles on the planet. How will climate change affect them, and is it already happening?

  • Data Science Students Team Up With Marine Biologist

    Data Science Students Team Up With Marine Biologist

    The students are using deep learning and neural networks to create an automated system that classifies plankton for large-scale oceanographic studies.

  • An Algorithm to Investigate Unwelcome Plankton

    An Algorithm to Investigate Unwelcome Plankton

    Computer scientists at Columbia University will work with oceanographers to understand what has caused an unusual plankton-like species to rapidly invade the Arabian Sea food chain, threatening fisheries that sustain more than 100 million people.

  • Ctene Sensations of the Arctic Ocean

    Ctene Sensations of the Arctic Ocean

    One of the goals of Andy Juhl’s and Craig Aumack’s Arctic research is to determine the role of ice algae as a source of nutrition for food webs existing in the water column and at the bottom of the Arctic ocean.

  • Investigating Life in Arctic Sea Ice

    Investigating Life in Arctic Sea Ice

    Andy Juhl and Craig Aumack, microbiologists from Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, are spending a month in Barrow, Alaska studying algae in and below sea ice, and how our warming climate may impact these important organisms.

  • Plankton Fishing in the Bering Sea

    Plankton Fishing in the Bering Sea

    As Discovery Channel fans know, the Bering Sea supports one of the world’s most productive fisheries, accounting for more than 50 percent of U.S. fish and shellfish catches. The goal of our study is to understand how climate change is impacting phytoplankton, and ultimately the Bering Sea ecosystem.

Banner featuring a collage of extreme heat images.

Recent record-breaking heat waves have affected communities across the world. The Extreme Heat Workshop will bring together researchers and practitioners to advance the state of knowledge, identify community needs, and develop a framework for evaluating risks with a focus on climate justice. Register by June 15

  • Plankton Are Central to Life on Earth. How Is Climate Change Affecting Them?

    Plankton Are Central to Life on Earth. How Is Climate Change Affecting Them?

    Plankton play many important roles on the planet. How will climate change affect them, and is it already happening?

  • Data Science Students Team Up With Marine Biologist

    Data Science Students Team Up With Marine Biologist

    The students are using deep learning and neural networks to create an automated system that classifies plankton for large-scale oceanographic studies.

  • An Algorithm to Investigate Unwelcome Plankton

    An Algorithm to Investigate Unwelcome Plankton

    Computer scientists at Columbia University will work with oceanographers to understand what has caused an unusual plankton-like species to rapidly invade the Arabian Sea food chain, threatening fisheries that sustain more than 100 million people.

  • Ctene Sensations of the Arctic Ocean

    Ctene Sensations of the Arctic Ocean

    One of the goals of Andy Juhl’s and Craig Aumack’s Arctic research is to determine the role of ice algae as a source of nutrition for food webs existing in the water column and at the bottom of the Arctic ocean.

  • Investigating Life in Arctic Sea Ice

    Investigating Life in Arctic Sea Ice

    Andy Juhl and Craig Aumack, microbiologists from Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, are spending a month in Barrow, Alaska studying algae in and below sea ice, and how our warming climate may impact these important organisms.

  • Plankton Fishing in the Bering Sea

    Plankton Fishing in the Bering Sea

    As Discovery Channel fans know, the Bering Sea supports one of the world’s most productive fisheries, accounting for more than 50 percent of U.S. fish and shellfish catches. The goal of our study is to understand how climate change is impacting phytoplankton, and ultimately the Bering Sea ecosystem.