State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

Refugees

  • Assessing Landslide Risk in Rohingya Refugee Camps

    Assessing Landslide Risk in Rohingya Refugee Camps

    NASA and Columbia University’s International Research Institute for Climate and Society partner with humanitarian organizations to provide near real-time data on land use, rainfall and elevation.

  • Climate Migrants Will Soon Shift Populations of Many Countries, Says World Bank

    Climate Migrants Will Soon Shift Populations of Many Countries, Says World Bank

    If emissions of greenhouse gases remain high, as many as 143 million “internal migrants” might move within their own countries by 2050.

  • Jordan on the Brink?

    Jordan on the Brink?

    With the recent unrest and violence in Syria, UN and humanitarian agencies estimate that between 120,000 and 140,000 refugees have arrived in Jordan. Can Jordan’s natural resources and social infrastructure handle such an influx?

Banner featuring a collage of extreme heat images.

Recent record-breaking heat waves have affected communities across the world. The Extreme Heat Workshop will bring together researchers and practitioners to advance the state of knowledge, identify community needs, and develop a framework for evaluating risks with a focus on climate justice. Register by June 15

  • Assessing Landslide Risk in Rohingya Refugee Camps

    Assessing Landslide Risk in Rohingya Refugee Camps

    NASA and Columbia University’s International Research Institute for Climate and Society partner with humanitarian organizations to provide near real-time data on land use, rainfall and elevation.

  • Climate Migrants Will Soon Shift Populations of Many Countries, Says World Bank

    Climate Migrants Will Soon Shift Populations of Many Countries, Says World Bank

    If emissions of greenhouse gases remain high, as many as 143 million “internal migrants” might move within their own countries by 2050.

  • Jordan on the Brink?

    Jordan on the Brink?

    With the recent unrest and violence in Syria, UN and humanitarian agencies estimate that between 120,000 and 140,000 refugees have arrived in Jordan. Can Jordan’s natural resources and social infrastructure handle such an influx?