News from the Columbia Climate School

Tag: Tracking Antarctica’s Ice Shelves

  • The ‘Bird’ Has Flown!

    The ‘Bird’ Has Flown!

    The ‘bird’ has flown! Voices are raised in celebratory cheers from the southernmost continent to across the U.S. Our first ALAMO float is deployed! Now we can begin to answer some of the big questions on this mysterious ice/ocean interface.

  • ‘Ghost Ice Shelves’ and the Third Antarctic Ice Sheet

    ‘Ghost Ice Shelves’ and the Third Antarctic Ice Sheet

    The Antarctica Peninsula has been referred to as Antarctica’s third ice sheet. Following behind the East and West Antarctic ice sheet in size, one might be inclined to minimize its importance in the effects of melting Antarctic ice, on changes in sea level and other impacts, but that would be an imprudent mistake. The peninsula…

  • The Domino Effect

    The Domino Effect

    Ice shelves can behave like dominos. When they are lined up and the first one collapses it can cause a rippling effect like dominos. We have seen this with the Larsen Ice Shelves. Named in series, the Larsen A, B and C shelves extended along the northeastern edge of the West Antarctic Peninsula, and covered…

  • A First Meeting with an Old Friend

    A First Meeting with an Old Friend

    If you have studied the impacts of climate on Antarctica you have encountered Pine Island Glacier. Tucked in at an angle under the West Antarctic Peninsula handle, this seemingly innocuous glacier has been making headlines for years as one of the fastest flowing ice stream glaciers on Earth.

  • Year by Year, Line by Line, We Build an Image of Getz Ice Shelf

    Year by Year, Line by Line, We Build an Image of Getz Ice Shelf

    Changes in Antarctic ice have been dominated by the interaction of the ice and the ocean, and because ice shelves extend out into the water they are vulnerable to melt from the warmer ocean water. Melt can affect them in two ways, through thinning along their length and through causing a retreat of the “grounding…

Science for the Planet: In these short video explainers, discover how scientists and scholars across the Columbia Climate School are working to understand the effects of climate change and help solve the crisis.
  • The ‘Bird’ Has Flown!

    The ‘Bird’ Has Flown!

    The ‘bird’ has flown! Voices are raised in celebratory cheers from the southernmost continent to across the U.S. Our first ALAMO float is deployed! Now we can begin to answer some of the big questions on this mysterious ice/ocean interface.

  • ‘Ghost Ice Shelves’ and the Third Antarctic Ice Sheet

    ‘Ghost Ice Shelves’ and the Third Antarctic Ice Sheet

    The Antarctica Peninsula has been referred to as Antarctica’s third ice sheet. Following behind the East and West Antarctic ice sheet in size, one might be inclined to minimize its importance in the effects of melting Antarctic ice, on changes in sea level and other impacts, but that would be an imprudent mistake. The peninsula…

  • The Domino Effect

    The Domino Effect

    Ice shelves can behave like dominos. When they are lined up and the first one collapses it can cause a rippling effect like dominos. We have seen this with the Larsen Ice Shelves. Named in series, the Larsen A, B and C shelves extended along the northeastern edge of the West Antarctic Peninsula, and covered…

  • A First Meeting with an Old Friend

    A First Meeting with an Old Friend

    If you have studied the impacts of climate on Antarctica you have encountered Pine Island Glacier. Tucked in at an angle under the West Antarctic Peninsula handle, this seemingly innocuous glacier has been making headlines for years as one of the fastest flowing ice stream glaciers on Earth.

  • Year by Year, Line by Line, We Build an Image of Getz Ice Shelf

    Year by Year, Line by Line, We Build an Image of Getz Ice Shelf

    Changes in Antarctic ice have been dominated by the interaction of the ice and the ocean, and because ice shelves extend out into the water they are vulnerable to melt from the warmer ocean water. Melt can affect them in two ways, through thinning along their length and through causing a retreat of the “grounding…