News from the Columbia Climate School

Dancing in the Darkness

Hatchet fish, approximately 3 cm long (photo taken by Adelaide Rhodes and Jarrod Scott)
Hatchet fish, approximately 3 cm long (photo taken by Adelaide Rhodes and Jarrod Scott)

 

In deep darkness, cunning lights are softly luring prey,

Drawing closer to the glow, only some will flee …

Subtle bodies, clear as glass, with organs on display,

Exquisite dances only certain piercing eyes can see.

Worm-like creatures undulate, jaws hang wide and gaping,

Iridescent, jeweled young ‘tween lurking hunters skitter.

The deadly art of eating faces that of death escaping,

From afar, a dazzling show, a many-legged glitter.

Armored, silver-plated, soft as jello, far from shore,

Seeking wonder, terror, treasure, out here I will be.

Stranger than the strangest film on aliens at war:

The scintillating, gorgeous sight of plankton in the sea.

 

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Further reading:

UNOLS Chief Scientist Training Cruise, “See Monsters Here”

UNOLS Chief Scientist Training Cruise, “Microscopic Zoo”

This poem was inspired by time spent on a UNOLS Chief Scientist Training Cruise (Barbados to Bermuda, June 2014).

 

This is one in a series of poems written by Katherine Allen, a researcher in geochemistry and paleoclimate at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Science for the Planet: In these short video explainers, discover how scientists and scholars across the Columbia Climate School are working to understand the effects of climate change and help solve the crisis.
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