News from the Columbia Climate School

Mysterious Mineral

Bridgmanite was identified in a shock-melt vein within the Tenham meteorite. Photograph by Chi Ma, Caltech
Bridgmanite was identified in a shock-melt vein within the Tenham meteorite. The mineral was named in honor of Percy Bridgman, who pioneered the diamond anvil cell for high-pressure research. Photograph by Chi Ma, Caltech

 

So common, yet far out of sight,

Mineralogists longed for a bite.

Formed deep inside,

Or when rocks collide,

At long last, a name: bridgmanite!

 

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Further reading:

Discovery of bridgmanite, the most abundant mineral in Earth, in a shocked meteorite, Tschauner et al. (2014) Science

Earth’s Most Abundant Mineral Finally Gets a Name, National Geographic

Space Rock Sheds Light on Mysterious Mineral on Earth, LiveScience

This is one in a series of poems written by Katherine Allen, a researcher in geochemistry and paleoclimate at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences at Rutgers University.

 

Science for the Planet: In these short video explainers, discover how scientists and scholars across the Columbia Climate School are working to understand the effects of climate change and help solve the crisis.
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