Kevin Krajick, Author at State of the Planet - Page 2 of 31

Kevin Krajick is the Earth Institute's senior editor for science news. He grew up in the Catskill Mountains and Hudson Valley of upstate New York, where he worked at his high-school newspaper. He started his professional career as a reporter covering crime, police and prisons across the United States. He has since reported from all 50 U.S. states and 30-some countries, writing about science, medicine, immigration and other subjects. His work has been featured in National Geographic, Newsweek, The New Yorker, Science, Smithsonian and many other publications. He was a 1981 finalist for the National Magazine Award for Public Service for his reporting on organized crime's links to the toxic waste-disposal industry. He is two-time winner of the American Geophysical Union's Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism, and his work has been featured repeatedly in the yearly book "Best American Science and Nature Writing." His widely praised 2001 book "Barren Lands" is the true account of how two prospectors discovered diamonds in Canada's remote far north. Krajick holds degrees in comparative literature and journalism from Columbia University. He lives on the Upper West Side of Manhattan with his wife and two daughters.

Recent Posts

Científicos afirman que un naufragio en la costa de Patagonia es un ballenero norteamericano perdido en 1859

En 1858, un velero partió de una ciudad costera del noreste de Estados Unidos para cazar ballenas alrededor del mundo y nunca regresó. ¿Dónde terminó? Investigadores de los hemisferios sur y norte se unieron para dar respuesta a este misterio.

by |August 24, 2022

Balancing Act: Can Precariously Perched Boulders Signal New York’s Earthquake Risk?

Long ago, melting glaciers dropped giant boulders onto surfaces in the New York City exurbs, and many seem to remain in their original, delicately balanced positions. Can they be used to judge the maximum sizes of past earthquakes?

by |July 21, 2022

Dinosaurs Took Over Amid Ice, Not Warmth, Says a New Study of Ancient Mass Extinction

There is new evidence that ancient high latitudes, to which early dinosaurs were largely relegated, regularly froze over, and that the creatures adapted—an apparent key to their later dominance.

by |July 1, 2022

Upcoming Scientific Fieldwork, 2022 and Beyond

Thumbnail descriptions of field projects on land, at sea and in the air, on every continent and every ocean.

by |May 11, 2022

In Sediments Below Antarctic Ice, Scientists Discover a Giant Groundwater System

For the first time, scientists have mapped in detail water locked in a deep basin far under the Antarctic ice. The discovery could have implications for how the continent reacts to, or even contributes to, climate change.

by |May 5, 2022

At a Melting Glacier, a Landslide, Then Tsunami, Signal Climate-Related Threat

A peculiar seismic signal was the first indication of a gigantic landslide and subsequent tsunami in the remote mountains of British Columbia. It detected what may be a growing climate-related threat.

by |April 6, 2022

Water Content Controls the Depth of Magma Storage Under Many Volcanoes, Says Study

Research into volcanoes in the Aleutian Islands and elsewhere overturns the conventional understanding of what controls the depth at which rising magma is stored.

by |March 10, 2022

A Slow-Motion Section of the San Andreas Fault May Not Be So Harmless After All

The central section of the great fault spanning California, thought to be creeping along harmlessly at the moment, has experienced big quakes in the past, says a new study.

by |February 28, 2022

Talking With Bill Ryan, Detective of the Deeps

Marine geologist William B.F. Ryan discusses once seemingly unlikely theories about the evolution of oceans and seas, the hunt for the wreck of the Titanic, the Biblical Flood, and more.

by |February 24, 2022

Lisa Goddard: Led Global Efforts to Advance Near-Term Climate Forecasting

Lisa Goddard, longtime director of the International Research Institute for Climate and Society, has died.

by |January 21, 2022