State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

Geohazards in Bangladesh

  • An Earthquake Changed the Course of the Ganges. Could It Happen Again?

    An Earthquake Changed the Course of the Ganges. Could It Happen Again?

    2,500 years ago, an earthquake changed the course of the mighty Ganges River, a new study shows. The region remains vulnerable to a similar event now.

  • Repairing Tectonic GNSS in Bangladesh’s Tea Region

    Repairing Tectonic GNSS in Bangladesh’s Tea Region

    The remainder of my fieldwork focuses on the GNSS (the general term for GPS) instruments in eastern Bangladesh to study the tectonics and earthquake hazard.

  • Finishing the Coastal Service Run

    Finishing the Coastal Service Run

    Traveling by boat, we are finishing our data collection and equipment servicing in coastal Bangladesh.

  • Back to the Sundarbans

    Back to the Sundarbans

    As part of our trip studying land subsidence and elevation changes, we boarded a boat to travel through the Sundarbans, the world’s largest mangrove forest.

  • Servicing My GNSS (GPS) in Bangladesh Once Again

    Servicing My GNSS (GPS) in Bangladesh Once Again

    The sustainability of the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta and Bangladesh depends on the balance of sea level rise, land subsidence and sedimentation. We are measuring the latter two across the coastal zone.

  • Land Subsidence in the Netherlands

    Land Subsidence in the Netherlands

    At a symposium on land subsidence, I learned about how the Dutch transformed their country so that about a quarter of it is below sea level and how they cope with it.

  • Exploring the Sundarbans and Back to Dhaka

    Exploring the Sundarbans and Back to Dhaka

    Our group of 24 Americans and Bangladeshis continued to explore the Sundarbans mangrove forest, rice farming in embanked low-lying islands, and heritage sites of Bangladesh.

  • Across the Ganges to Southwest Bangladesh and the Sundarbans

    Across the Ganges to Southwest Bangladesh and the Sundarbans

    Our group of 23 American and Bangladeshi students and professors traveled from the Jamuna River to the Ganges and Gorai Rivers, and then down to an island on the edge of the Sundarbans, the world’s largest mangrove forest.

  • Taking My Class to Bangladesh

    Taking My Class to Bangladesh

    My undergraduate Sustainable Development course is in Bangladesh for a Spring Break trip to see what they have been learning about. We will be touring the country by bus and boat to learn about the environment and people of Bangladesh.

Banner featuring a collage of extreme heat images.

Recent record-breaking heat waves have affected communities across the world. The Extreme Heat Workshop will bring together researchers and practitioners to advance the state of knowledge, identify community needs, and develop a framework for evaluating risks with a focus on climate justice. Register by June 15

  • An Earthquake Changed the Course of the Ganges. Could It Happen Again?

    An Earthquake Changed the Course of the Ganges. Could It Happen Again?

    2,500 years ago, an earthquake changed the course of the mighty Ganges River, a new study shows. The region remains vulnerable to a similar event now.

  • Repairing Tectonic GNSS in Bangladesh’s Tea Region

    Repairing Tectonic GNSS in Bangladesh’s Tea Region

    The remainder of my fieldwork focuses on the GNSS (the general term for GPS) instruments in eastern Bangladesh to study the tectonics and earthquake hazard.

  • Finishing the Coastal Service Run

    Finishing the Coastal Service Run

    Traveling by boat, we are finishing our data collection and equipment servicing in coastal Bangladesh.

  • Back to the Sundarbans

    Back to the Sundarbans

    As part of our trip studying land subsidence and elevation changes, we boarded a boat to travel through the Sundarbans, the world’s largest mangrove forest.

  • Servicing My GNSS (GPS) in Bangladesh Once Again

    Servicing My GNSS (GPS) in Bangladesh Once Again

    The sustainability of the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta and Bangladesh depends on the balance of sea level rise, land subsidence and sedimentation. We are measuring the latter two across the coastal zone.

  • Land Subsidence in the Netherlands

    Land Subsidence in the Netherlands

    At a symposium on land subsidence, I learned about how the Dutch transformed their country so that about a quarter of it is below sea level and how they cope with it.

  • Exploring the Sundarbans and Back to Dhaka

    Exploring the Sundarbans and Back to Dhaka

    Our group of 24 Americans and Bangladeshis continued to explore the Sundarbans mangrove forest, rice farming in embanked low-lying islands, and heritage sites of Bangladesh.

  • Across the Ganges to Southwest Bangladesh and the Sundarbans

    Across the Ganges to Southwest Bangladesh and the Sundarbans

    Our group of 23 American and Bangladeshi students and professors traveled from the Jamuna River to the Ganges and Gorai Rivers, and then down to an island on the edge of the Sundarbans, the world’s largest mangrove forest.

  • Taking My Class to Bangladesh

    Taking My Class to Bangladesh

    My undergraduate Sustainable Development course is in Bangladesh for a Spring Break trip to see what they have been learning about. We will be touring the country by bus and boat to learn about the environment and people of Bangladesh.