News from the Columbia Climate School

Tag: bioswales

  • So Much Depends on a Tree Guard

    So Much Depends on a Tree Guard

    Adding protective barriers around street trees could reduce load on city sewers, study finds.

  • New York Lets a Thousand Bioswales Bloom

    New York Lets a Thousand Bioswales Bloom

    In an effort to curb sewage overflows, New York City has turned to green infrastructure: right-of-way bioswales, green roofs and rain gardens, among other practices. These measures help decrease stormwater runoff by increasing pervious areas and introducing water-loving plants that can absorb some of the water and encourage evaporation.

  • Just How Effective is Green Infrastructure?

    Just How Effective is Green Infrastructure?

    Over the next 18 years, New York City’s 2010 Green Infrastructure Plan will spend $2.4 billion on green infrastructure— green roofs, tree plantings, and increased vegetation— to combat coastal pollution. But how does green infrastructure work and how effective is it really?

Science for the Planet: In these short video explainers, discover how scientists and scholars across the Columbia Climate School are working to understand the effects of climate change and help solve the crisis.
  • So Much Depends on a Tree Guard

    So Much Depends on a Tree Guard

    Adding protective barriers around street trees could reduce load on city sewers, study finds.

  • New York Lets a Thousand Bioswales Bloom

    New York Lets a Thousand Bioswales Bloom

    In an effort to curb sewage overflows, New York City has turned to green infrastructure: right-of-way bioswales, green roofs and rain gardens, among other practices. These measures help decrease stormwater runoff by increasing pervious areas and introducing water-loving plants that can absorb some of the water and encourage evaporation.

  • Just How Effective is Green Infrastructure?

    Just How Effective is Green Infrastructure?

    Over the next 18 years, New York City’s 2010 Green Infrastructure Plan will spend $2.4 billion on green infrastructure— green roofs, tree plantings, and increased vegetation— to combat coastal pollution. But how does green infrastructure work and how effective is it really?