State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

climate variability

  • Ethiopia Establishes National Framework for Climate Services

    Ethiopia Establishes National Framework for Climate Services

    In Ethiopia, climate variability can have a big impact on food, water, and health. A system to monitor and predict climate will help to keep people safe.

  • Learning from a River’s History to Prepare for the Future

    Learning from a River’s History to Prepare for the Future

    Researchers from eight universities, including Columbia University, are using tree ring and glacier analysis to reconstruct the climate history of the Missouri River Basin in order to give policymakers and water managers better decision-making tools to manage the river.

  • Project Aims to Strengthen Climate Resilience

    Project Aims to Strengthen Climate Resilience

    The Caribbean, Asia’s Indo-Gangetic Plain and West Africa are three regions known to be extremely vulnerable to climate variability and change, particularly to droughts, extreme weather events and stresses on food production, water resources and coastal areas. A new five-year project jointly led by the International Research Institute for Climate and Society and the University…

  • A River Runs Through It: Predicting Floods in the Midwest

    A River Runs Through It: Predicting Floods in the Midwest

    Focusing on the American Midwest, Andrew Robertson analyzes the relationships between floods, weather and climate patters throughout the 20th century.

  • Welcome Back, La Niña

    Welcome Back, La Niña

    The components of La Niña are getting ready to tango. But will their performance break any climate records this time around?

  • Fears of a Double Dip…La Niña

    Fears of a Double Dip…La Niña

    You’d be forgiven for thinking its 2008 and not just because of the economic uncertainty. Is there a dreaded double dip La Niña in store, too?

  • The Role of Drought in the Horn of Africa Famine

    The Role of Drought in the Horn of Africa Famine

    Let’s get this out of the way. The current famine in the Horn of Africa isn’t caused by drought. Rather, a complex mix of societal and political factors created a dangerous situation. The worst drought in 60 years (pdf) is what pushed that situation over the edge into a humanitarian crisis. However, just as these…

  • Climate Forecasting: Oceans, Droughts, Climate Change and Other Tools of the Trade

    Climate Forecasting: Oceans, Droughts, Climate Change and Other Tools of the Trade

    At the International Research Institute for Climate and Society’s monthly climate briefing, talk often focuses on the role that El Niño or La Niña play in driving global climate. With the collapse of La Niña last month, though, IRI’s forecasters now have to rely on different tools to offer forecasts for the coming year. That’s…

  • R.I.P. La Niña

    R.I.P. La Niña

    La Niña, we hardly knew ye. This year’s iteration of the climate phenomenon nearly set records for strength and riled up world weather for nine months. Now it’s dead. What’s next?

Banner featuring a collage of extreme heat images.

Recent record-breaking heat waves have affected communities across the world. The Extreme Heat Workshop will bring together researchers and practitioners to advance the state of knowledge, identify community needs, and develop a framework for evaluating risks with a focus on climate justice. Register by June 15

  • Ethiopia Establishes National Framework for Climate Services

    Ethiopia Establishes National Framework for Climate Services

    In Ethiopia, climate variability can have a big impact on food, water, and health. A system to monitor and predict climate will help to keep people safe.

  • Learning from a River’s History to Prepare for the Future

    Learning from a River’s History to Prepare for the Future

    Researchers from eight universities, including Columbia University, are using tree ring and glacier analysis to reconstruct the climate history of the Missouri River Basin in order to give policymakers and water managers better decision-making tools to manage the river.

  • Project Aims to Strengthen Climate Resilience

    Project Aims to Strengthen Climate Resilience

    The Caribbean, Asia’s Indo-Gangetic Plain and West Africa are three regions known to be extremely vulnerable to climate variability and change, particularly to droughts, extreme weather events and stresses on food production, water resources and coastal areas. A new five-year project jointly led by the International Research Institute for Climate and Society and the University…

  • A River Runs Through It: Predicting Floods in the Midwest

    A River Runs Through It: Predicting Floods in the Midwest

    Focusing on the American Midwest, Andrew Robertson analyzes the relationships between floods, weather and climate patters throughout the 20th century.

  • Welcome Back, La Niña

    Welcome Back, La Niña

    The components of La Niña are getting ready to tango. But will their performance break any climate records this time around?

  • Fears of a Double Dip…La Niña

    Fears of a Double Dip…La Niña

    You’d be forgiven for thinking its 2008 and not just because of the economic uncertainty. Is there a dreaded double dip La Niña in store, too?

  • The Role of Drought in the Horn of Africa Famine

    The Role of Drought in the Horn of Africa Famine

    Let’s get this out of the way. The current famine in the Horn of Africa isn’t caused by drought. Rather, a complex mix of societal and political factors created a dangerous situation. The worst drought in 60 years (pdf) is what pushed that situation over the edge into a humanitarian crisis. However, just as these…

  • Climate Forecasting: Oceans, Droughts, Climate Change and Other Tools of the Trade

    Climate Forecasting: Oceans, Droughts, Climate Change and Other Tools of the Trade

    At the International Research Institute for Climate and Society’s monthly climate briefing, talk often focuses on the role that El Niño or La Niña play in driving global climate. With the collapse of La Niña last month, though, IRI’s forecasters now have to rely on different tools to offer forecasts for the coming year. That’s…

  • R.I.P. La Niña

    R.I.P. La Niña

    La Niña, we hardly knew ye. This year’s iteration of the climate phenomenon nearly set records for strength and riled up world weather for nine months. Now it’s dead. What’s next?