State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

coastal erosion

  • Tidal Communities Make Their Case for Shaping Resilient Coastal Futures

    Tidal Communities Make Their Case for Shaping Resilient Coastal Futures

    A recent conversation focused on three coastlines where Indigenous and Black communities are caught between rising seas and societal and development threats on land.

  • The Tribe That Brought a Damaged Shoreline Back to Life

    The Tribe That Brought a Damaged Shoreline Back to Life

    How the Shinnecock Indian Nation Tribe in Long Island, NY, transformed a desolate and barren stretch of shoreline to protect their land from erosion and sea-level rise

  • How Drones are Advancing Scientific Research

    How Drones are Advancing Scientific Research

    Where once scientists could only observe earth from above by using manned aircraft or satellites, today they are expanding, developing and refining their research in a variety of ways thanks to drones.

  • Keeping an Eye on Coastal Erosion

    Keeping an Eye on Coastal Erosion

    Searching for a fast, simple and low-cost way to monitor Earth’s changing coastlines, a team of scientists, including Lamont-Doherty Observatory postdoctoral researcher and marine scientist Alessio Rovere, has found an innovative use for drones.

  • Coastal Erosion and Adaptation to Climate Change

    Coastal Erosion and Adaptation to Climate Change

    Increasing understanding of the extent of coastal erosion and its interaction with other naturally existing geographical features such as mangrove vegetation is one of the areas of research that may help reduce vulnerability of small-island developing states to climate hazards.

  • Cape May, New Jersey’s Battle Against Nature

    Cape May, New Jersey’s Battle Against Nature

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers battles an encroaching ocean, but how long will their funding hold out?

Columbia campus skyline with text Columbia Climate School Class Day 2024 - Congratulations Graduates

Congratulations to our Columbia Climate School MA in Climate & Society Class of 2024! Learn about our May 10 Class Day celebration. #ColumbiaClimate2024

  • Tidal Communities Make Their Case for Shaping Resilient Coastal Futures

    Tidal Communities Make Their Case for Shaping Resilient Coastal Futures

    A recent conversation focused on three coastlines where Indigenous and Black communities are caught between rising seas and societal and development threats on land.

  • The Tribe That Brought a Damaged Shoreline Back to Life

    The Tribe That Brought a Damaged Shoreline Back to Life

    How the Shinnecock Indian Nation Tribe in Long Island, NY, transformed a desolate and barren stretch of shoreline to protect their land from erosion and sea-level rise

  • How Drones are Advancing Scientific Research

    How Drones are Advancing Scientific Research

    Where once scientists could only observe earth from above by using manned aircraft or satellites, today they are expanding, developing and refining their research in a variety of ways thanks to drones.

  • Keeping an Eye on Coastal Erosion

    Keeping an Eye on Coastal Erosion

    Searching for a fast, simple and low-cost way to monitor Earth’s changing coastlines, a team of scientists, including Lamont-Doherty Observatory postdoctoral researcher and marine scientist Alessio Rovere, has found an innovative use for drones.

  • Coastal Erosion and Adaptation to Climate Change

    Coastal Erosion and Adaptation to Climate Change

    Increasing understanding of the extent of coastal erosion and its interaction with other naturally existing geographical features such as mangrove vegetation is one of the areas of research that may help reduce vulnerability of small-island developing states to climate hazards.

  • Cape May, New Jersey’s Battle Against Nature

    Cape May, New Jersey’s Battle Against Nature

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers battles an encroaching ocean, but how long will their funding hold out?