State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

communicating climate2

  • As Predicted: A Rising Tide of Migration

    As Predicted: A Rising Tide of Migration

    “With sea levels on the rise, several island nations are scrambling to stay above water and ensure citizens will have a place to go when the ocean engulfs their homeland. The humanitarian-crisis phase of climate change has officially begun.”

  • Filling a Climate Gap and Helping Rwandan Farmers

    Filling a Climate Gap and Helping Rwandan Farmers

    Agriculture makes up a major portion of Rwanda’s economy, and employs eight in 10 Rwandans. Of course, farmers are hugely dependent on the climate, and a new project hopes to ensure they get timely information so they can plan for both good times and bad.

  • Helping Communities Respond to Climate Change

    Helping Communities Respond to Climate Change

    A new tool helps scientists communicate better with communities on global climate change issues, increasing awareness and stakeholder engagement.

  • Sea Level Rise: How Much, How Fast?

    Sea Level Rise: How Much, How Fast?

    By studying modeled climate evidence from the last interglacial period, the team concluded that the warming going on today risks setting off “feedbacks” in the climate system.

  • How to Have the Climate Change Conversation

    How to Have the Climate Change Conversation

    On Thursday, October 29, the Earth Institute and the School of International of Public Affairs hosted a panel on Sustainability and Climate Change in the 2016 Presidential Race. The panel was moderated by Chuck Todd of NBC’s Meet the Press. The panelists discussed how to frame the climate change conversation in such a polarized political…

  • In 2015: Hot, Wet and Opinionated

    In 2015: Hot, Wet and Opinionated

    This year is shaping up to be the warmest year on record since 1880, according to new data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. And, perhaps not so coincidentally, a new poll says more people in the United States are coming around to the view that climate change is happening.

  • What the World Thinks of Climate Change

    What the World Thinks of Climate Change

    We all know that climate change can generate great debate in the United States. But what about the rest of the world?

  • A Climate Battle Cry for Earth Day

    A Climate Battle Cry for Earth Day

    A group of 17 renowned scientists from around the world are appealing for dramatic action to forestall the worst effects of climate change, issuing an “Earth Statement” that calls for a world powered with zero carbon emissions by mid-century.

  • What Will You Leave Behind? How Personal Legacy Affects Pro-environmental Behavior

    What Will You Leave Behind? How Personal Legacy Affects Pro-environmental Behavior

    New research from the Center for Research on Environmental Decisions finds that personal legacy can be a motivator to encourage pro-environmental behaviors.

Banner featuring a collage of extreme heat images.

Recent record-breaking heat waves have affected communities across the world. The Extreme Heat Workshop will bring together researchers and practitioners to advance the state of knowledge, identify community needs, and develop a framework for evaluating risks with a focus on climate justice. Register by June 15

  • As Predicted: A Rising Tide of Migration

    As Predicted: A Rising Tide of Migration

    “With sea levels on the rise, several island nations are scrambling to stay above water and ensure citizens will have a place to go when the ocean engulfs their homeland. The humanitarian-crisis phase of climate change has officially begun.”

  • Filling a Climate Gap and Helping Rwandan Farmers

    Filling a Climate Gap and Helping Rwandan Farmers

    Agriculture makes up a major portion of Rwanda’s economy, and employs eight in 10 Rwandans. Of course, farmers are hugely dependent on the climate, and a new project hopes to ensure they get timely information so they can plan for both good times and bad.

  • Helping Communities Respond to Climate Change

    Helping Communities Respond to Climate Change

    A new tool helps scientists communicate better with communities on global climate change issues, increasing awareness and stakeholder engagement.

  • Sea Level Rise: How Much, How Fast?

    Sea Level Rise: How Much, How Fast?

    By studying modeled climate evidence from the last interglacial period, the team concluded that the warming going on today risks setting off “feedbacks” in the climate system.

  • How to Have the Climate Change Conversation

    How to Have the Climate Change Conversation

    On Thursday, October 29, the Earth Institute and the School of International of Public Affairs hosted a panel on Sustainability and Climate Change in the 2016 Presidential Race. The panel was moderated by Chuck Todd of NBC’s Meet the Press. The panelists discussed how to frame the climate change conversation in such a polarized political…

  • In 2015: Hot, Wet and Opinionated

    In 2015: Hot, Wet and Opinionated

    This year is shaping up to be the warmest year on record since 1880, according to new data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. And, perhaps not so coincidentally, a new poll says more people in the United States are coming around to the view that climate change is happening.

  • What the World Thinks of Climate Change

    What the World Thinks of Climate Change

    We all know that climate change can generate great debate in the United States. But what about the rest of the world?

  • A Climate Battle Cry for Earth Day

    A Climate Battle Cry for Earth Day

    A group of 17 renowned scientists from around the world are appealing for dramatic action to forestall the worst effects of climate change, issuing an “Earth Statement” that calls for a world powered with zero carbon emissions by mid-century.

  • What Will You Leave Behind? How Personal Legacy Affects Pro-environmental Behavior

    What Will You Leave Behind? How Personal Legacy Affects Pro-environmental Behavior

    New research from the Center for Research on Environmental Decisions finds that personal legacy can be a motivator to encourage pro-environmental behaviors.