News from the Columbia Climate School

Tag: GEOTRACES

  • Project Maps the Chemistry of the World’s Oceans

    Project Maps the Chemistry of the World’s Oceans

    Until recently, too little data existed about the distribution of trace elements and nutrients in the oceans to provide a global picture. In 2002, a group of scientists connected with Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory set out to fill those gaps.

  • Anatomy of an ‘Ice Station’

    Anatomy of an ‘Ice Station’

    Completing an “Ice Station” means collecting samples over a wide range of Arctic water and ice conditions. Each station means a major orchestration of people and resources.

  • Arctic Magic: One Research Vessel Multiplies to Hundreds

    Arctic Magic: One Research Vessel Multiplies to Hundreds

    The Arctic is magical, that we know, but when one ship multiplies to hundreds of small boats we really see the effect that Arctic magic can bring.

  • A Week of Firsts for This Arctic Nation

    A Week of Firsts for This Arctic Nation

    We are closing in on a week of intense focus and excitement for GEOTRACES and for the United States around the Arctic. President Obama became the first sitting president to visit Alaska, the US Coast Guard Cutter Healy with US GEOTRACES scientists completed the first unaccompanied US surface vessel transit to the North Pole, and…

  • It’s as Clear as Mud

    It’s as Clear as Mud

    For the sampling GEOTRACES is doing in the Arctic there is a specific goal of collecting just the top few dozen centimeters of sediment and the water just above it. Although the plan was good, things don’t always go perfectly.

  • Scouring Arctic for Traces of Fukushima and Cosmic Rays

    Scouring Arctic for Traces of Fukushima and Cosmic Rays

    Sounds like the basis for a great scifi thriller…”scientists scour Arctic, hunting for traces of nuclear fallout and ejections from cosmic ray impacts”. In reality this thriller theme is the actual core of the GEOTRACES mission.

  • Moving into the Realm of the Polar Bear

    Moving into the Realm of the Polar Bear

    When we venture into the Arctic for research for most of us there is the lingering hope that a polar bear will appear on our watch; at least as long as we are safely outside of its reach.

  • Tracing the Arctic

    Tracing the Arctic

    The land surrounding the Arctic Ocean is like a set of cradling arms, holding the ocean and the sea ice in a circular grasp. Within that cradle is a unique mix of waters, including freshwater from melting glacial ice and large rivers, and a salty mix of relatively warm Atlantic water and the cooler Pacific…

Science for the Planet: In these short video explainers, discover how scientists and scholars across the Columbia Climate School are working to understand the effects of climate change and help solve the crisis.
  • Project Maps the Chemistry of the World’s Oceans

    Project Maps the Chemistry of the World’s Oceans

    Until recently, too little data existed about the distribution of trace elements and nutrients in the oceans to provide a global picture. In 2002, a group of scientists connected with Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory set out to fill those gaps.

  • Anatomy of an ‘Ice Station’

    Anatomy of an ‘Ice Station’

    Completing an “Ice Station” means collecting samples over a wide range of Arctic water and ice conditions. Each station means a major orchestration of people and resources.

  • Arctic Magic: One Research Vessel Multiplies to Hundreds

    Arctic Magic: One Research Vessel Multiplies to Hundreds

    The Arctic is magical, that we know, but when one ship multiplies to hundreds of small boats we really see the effect that Arctic magic can bring.

  • A Week of Firsts for This Arctic Nation

    A Week of Firsts for This Arctic Nation

    We are closing in on a week of intense focus and excitement for GEOTRACES and for the United States around the Arctic. President Obama became the first sitting president to visit Alaska, the US Coast Guard Cutter Healy with US GEOTRACES scientists completed the first unaccompanied US surface vessel transit to the North Pole, and…

  • It’s as Clear as Mud

    It’s as Clear as Mud

    For the sampling GEOTRACES is doing in the Arctic there is a specific goal of collecting just the top few dozen centimeters of sediment and the water just above it. Although the plan was good, things don’t always go perfectly.

  • Scouring Arctic for Traces of Fukushima and Cosmic Rays

    Scouring Arctic for Traces of Fukushima and Cosmic Rays

    Sounds like the basis for a great scifi thriller…”scientists scour Arctic, hunting for traces of nuclear fallout and ejections from cosmic ray impacts”. In reality this thriller theme is the actual core of the GEOTRACES mission.

  • Moving into the Realm of the Polar Bear

    Moving into the Realm of the Polar Bear

    When we venture into the Arctic for research for most of us there is the lingering hope that a polar bear will appear on our watch; at least as long as we are safely outside of its reach.

  • Tracing the Arctic

    Tracing the Arctic

    The land surrounding the Arctic Ocean is like a set of cradling arms, holding the ocean and the sea ice in a circular grasp. Within that cradle is a unique mix of waters, including freshwater from melting glacial ice and large rivers, and a salty mix of relatively warm Atlantic water and the cooler Pacific…