State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

hawaii

  • The Surprising Way a Volcanic Eruption Fueled a Bloom of Ocean Algae

    The Surprising Way a Volcanic Eruption Fueled a Bloom of Ocean Algae

    A new study reveals a surprising way in which lava influences marine ecology.

  • Photos and Videos From Hawaii’s Volcanic Eruption

    Photos and Videos From Hawaii’s Volcanic Eruption

    Volcanologist Einat Lev shares incredible footage of steam plumes, lava fountains, and more from the Kilauea eruption.

  • Tracking the Kilauea Eruption

    Tracking the Kilauea Eruption

    Volcanologist Einat Lev is tracking lava flows at Hawaii’s volcanic eruption. Here, she describes what conditions are like on the ground—and in the sky.

  • Eavesdropping on the Ocean’s Mighty Microorganisms

    Eavesdropping on the Ocean’s Mighty Microorganisms

    Now, nearing the end of our three-week cruise of the North Pacific off Hawaii, we are working to understand how these tiny bacteria connect and communicate with one another.

  • Deep thoughts from the Deep Blue Sea

    Deep thoughts from the Deep Blue Sea

    The sea is a deep blue, so clear that you might think it was devoid of life. We have seen only a few seabirds circling the ship and playing in the air currents we generate. We haven’t seen any whales or sharks, only an occasional flying fish taking to the air in front of our…

  • Racing time to Explore Ocean Ecosystems: A Mother’s Work

    Racing time to Explore Ocean Ecosystems: A Mother’s Work

    Scientists like myself are in a race against time to understand the fundamental drivers of ocean ecosystems before climate change pushes them towards a new unknown state.

  • Photo Essay: Land, Lava, People

    Photo Essay: Land, Lava, People

    On Hawaii, lava is a way of life. The whole island is made of the stuff. Eruptions from Kilauea volcano have been adding new land and wiping out old for all of human time, and far before. In recent decades, lava flows have wiped out communities and major roads. The latest eruption, which began in June 2014, now…

  • In Hawaii, Living With Lava

    In Hawaii, Living With Lava

    When the most recent eruption of Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano started last June, Melvin Sugimoto at first did not think much of it. Hawaii, where he has lived all his life, is made entirely of hardened lava, and Kilauea, perhaps the world’s most active volcano, has been adding more off and on for the last 300,000 years. “Lava is…

  • Tree Rings on Hawai’i Could Hold New Knowledge About El Niño

    Tree Rings on Hawai’i Could Hold New Knowledge About El Niño

    Annual tree rings are a rare find in the tropical islands of the eastern Pacific. The new discovery of trees with annual rings on a Hawaiian volcano could provide new climate data from a part of the world where much of the variability of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation originates.

Columbia campus skyline with text Columbia Climate School Class Day 2024 - Congratulations Graduates

Congratulations to our Columbia Climate School MA in Climate & Society Class of 2024! Learn about our May 10 Class Day celebration. #ColumbiaClimate2024

  • The Surprising Way a Volcanic Eruption Fueled a Bloom of Ocean Algae

    The Surprising Way a Volcanic Eruption Fueled a Bloom of Ocean Algae

    A new study reveals a surprising way in which lava influences marine ecology.

  • Photos and Videos From Hawaii’s Volcanic Eruption

    Photos and Videos From Hawaii’s Volcanic Eruption

    Volcanologist Einat Lev shares incredible footage of steam plumes, lava fountains, and more from the Kilauea eruption.

  • Tracking the Kilauea Eruption

    Tracking the Kilauea Eruption

    Volcanologist Einat Lev is tracking lava flows at Hawaii’s volcanic eruption. Here, she describes what conditions are like on the ground—and in the sky.

  • Eavesdropping on the Ocean’s Mighty Microorganisms

    Eavesdropping on the Ocean’s Mighty Microorganisms

    Now, nearing the end of our three-week cruise of the North Pacific off Hawaii, we are working to understand how these tiny bacteria connect and communicate with one another.

  • Deep thoughts from the Deep Blue Sea

    Deep thoughts from the Deep Blue Sea

    The sea is a deep blue, so clear that you might think it was devoid of life. We have seen only a few seabirds circling the ship and playing in the air currents we generate. We haven’t seen any whales or sharks, only an occasional flying fish taking to the air in front of our…

  • Racing time to Explore Ocean Ecosystems: A Mother’s Work

    Racing time to Explore Ocean Ecosystems: A Mother’s Work

    Scientists like myself are in a race against time to understand the fundamental drivers of ocean ecosystems before climate change pushes them towards a new unknown state.

  • Photo Essay: Land, Lava, People

    Photo Essay: Land, Lava, People

    On Hawaii, lava is a way of life. The whole island is made of the stuff. Eruptions from Kilauea volcano have been adding new land and wiping out old for all of human time, and far before. In recent decades, lava flows have wiped out communities and major roads. The latest eruption, which began in June 2014, now…

  • In Hawaii, Living With Lava

    In Hawaii, Living With Lava

    When the most recent eruption of Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano started last June, Melvin Sugimoto at first did not think much of it. Hawaii, where he has lived all his life, is made entirely of hardened lava, and Kilauea, perhaps the world’s most active volcano, has been adding more off and on for the last 300,000 years. “Lava is…

  • Tree Rings on Hawai’i Could Hold New Knowledge About El Niño

    Tree Rings on Hawai’i Could Hold New Knowledge About El Niño

    Annual tree rings are a rare find in the tropical islands of the eastern Pacific. The new discovery of trees with annual rings on a Hawaiian volcano could provide new climate data from a part of the world where much of the variability of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation originates.