State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

polar research

  • Why Care About the Polar Regions? These Polar Climate Ambassadors Will Tell You.

    Why Care About the Polar Regions? These Polar Climate Ambassadors Will Tell You.

    The polar regions are a critical aspect of the climate crisis, but polar science is not always accessible, especially to young students. The Polar Climate Ambassadors program seeks to help close this gap. 

  • Refining Projections of Antarctic Ice Loss and Global Sea Level Rise

    Refining Projections of Antarctic Ice Loss and Global Sea Level Rise

    Research by Center for Climate and Life Fellow Pierre Dutrieux will lead to greater understanding of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet’s future stability and associated sea level rise.

  • The Melting of the Greenland Ice, Seen Up Very Close

    The Melting of the Greenland Ice, Seen Up Very Close

    A small team of scientists ventures out onto the Greenland ice sheet to study the forces large and small that are accelerating the melting of the world’s second-largest ice mass.

  • Photo Essay: Melting Greenland, Up Close

    Photo Essay: Melting Greenland, Up Close

    As climate warms, the Greenland ice sheet is melting, helping to fuel global sea-level rise. Follow a small team of scientists as they hike onto the sheet to investigate the forces large and small that are demolishing the ice.

  • Wonder Woman: Lamont Polar Pioneer Robin Bell

    Wonder Woman: Lamont Polar Pioneer Robin Bell

    Lamont’s Robin Bell is living proof of the importance of encouraging young women to study STEM disciplines. Her breakthrough research, fueled by passionate intellectual curiosity, has been critical to understanding our planet.

  • East Antarctic Ice Sheet Should Remain Stable Even if the West Melts

    East Antarctic Ice Sheet Should Remain Stable Even if the West Melts

    A new look inside the ice sheet validates predictions that it probably won’t melt as quickly as its neighbor—good news, since East Antarctica contains enough water to raise sea levels by 200 feet.

  • Water Is Streaming Across Antarctica

    Water Is Streaming Across Antarctica

    In the first such continent-wide survey, scientists have found extensive drainages of meltwater flowing over parts of Antarctica’s ice during the brief summer. Many of the newly mapped drainages are not new, but the fact they exist at all is significant; they appear to proliferate with small upswings in temperature, so warming projected for this…

  • Exploring Beneath Earth’s Changing Ice Sheets

    Exploring Beneath Earth’s Changing Ice Sheets

    If just the West Antarctic Ice Sheet were to melt, it would raise global sea level by 6 meters. That’s more than a theoretical problem. West Antarctica is losing ice mass, and scientists are worried.

  • Smooth Sailing Back to Tasmania

    Smooth Sailing Back to Tasmania

    After a surprisingly smooth crossing of the Southern Ocean, with favorable winds we arrived back in Hobart, Tasmania. The weather maps show that we just got ahead of another big storm system.

Banner featuring a collage of extreme heat images.

Recent record-breaking heat waves have affected communities across the world. The Extreme Heat Workshop will bring together researchers and practitioners to advance the state of knowledge, identify community needs, and develop a framework for evaluating risks with a focus on climate justice. Register by June 15

  • Why Care About the Polar Regions? These Polar Climate Ambassadors Will Tell You.

    Why Care About the Polar Regions? These Polar Climate Ambassadors Will Tell You.

    The polar regions are a critical aspect of the climate crisis, but polar science is not always accessible, especially to young students. The Polar Climate Ambassadors program seeks to help close this gap. 

  • Refining Projections of Antarctic Ice Loss and Global Sea Level Rise

    Refining Projections of Antarctic Ice Loss and Global Sea Level Rise

    Research by Center for Climate and Life Fellow Pierre Dutrieux will lead to greater understanding of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet’s future stability and associated sea level rise.

  • The Melting of the Greenland Ice, Seen Up Very Close

    The Melting of the Greenland Ice, Seen Up Very Close

    A small team of scientists ventures out onto the Greenland ice sheet to study the forces large and small that are accelerating the melting of the world’s second-largest ice mass.

  • Photo Essay: Melting Greenland, Up Close

    Photo Essay: Melting Greenland, Up Close

    As climate warms, the Greenland ice sheet is melting, helping to fuel global sea-level rise. Follow a small team of scientists as they hike onto the sheet to investigate the forces large and small that are demolishing the ice.

  • Wonder Woman: Lamont Polar Pioneer Robin Bell

    Wonder Woman: Lamont Polar Pioneer Robin Bell

    Lamont’s Robin Bell is living proof of the importance of encouraging young women to study STEM disciplines. Her breakthrough research, fueled by passionate intellectual curiosity, has been critical to understanding our planet.

  • East Antarctic Ice Sheet Should Remain Stable Even if the West Melts

    East Antarctic Ice Sheet Should Remain Stable Even if the West Melts

    A new look inside the ice sheet validates predictions that it probably won’t melt as quickly as its neighbor—good news, since East Antarctica contains enough water to raise sea levels by 200 feet.

  • Water Is Streaming Across Antarctica

    Water Is Streaming Across Antarctica

    In the first such continent-wide survey, scientists have found extensive drainages of meltwater flowing over parts of Antarctica’s ice during the brief summer. Many of the newly mapped drainages are not new, but the fact they exist at all is significant; they appear to proliferate with small upswings in temperature, so warming projected for this…

  • Exploring Beneath Earth’s Changing Ice Sheets

    Exploring Beneath Earth’s Changing Ice Sheets

    If just the West Antarctic Ice Sheet were to melt, it would raise global sea level by 6 meters. That’s more than a theoretical problem. West Antarctica is losing ice mass, and scientists are worried.

  • Smooth Sailing Back to Tasmania

    Smooth Sailing Back to Tasmania

    After a surprisingly smooth crossing of the Southern Ocean, with favorable winds we arrived back in Hobart, Tasmania. The weather maps show that we just got ahead of another big storm system.