News from the Columbia Climate School

Tag: R/V Marcus G. Langseth

  • Life Aboard the Langseth

    Life Aboard the Langseth

    Daily life on a research vessel is smaller and slower-paced — in a good way, for the most part.

  • Looking for the Origin of Slow Earthquakes in the Guerrero Gap

    Looking for the Origin of Slow Earthquakes in the Guerrero Gap

    We are underway on our 48-day long expedition offshore of the west coast of Mexico near Acapulco, where the young Cocos oceanic plate dives beneath the North American plate.

  • Lamont-Doherty Receives Donation of Marine Seismic Technology Upgrades

    Lamont-Doherty Receives Donation of Marine Seismic Technology Upgrades

    A generous donation from leading geoscience firm CGG Inc. will advance the research capacities of the Langseth research ship.

  • Ancient Faults & Water Are Sparking Earthquakes Off Alaska

    Ancient Faults & Water Are Sparking Earthquakes Off Alaska

    Ancient faults that formed in the ocean floor millions of years ago are feeding earthquakes today along stretches of the Alaska Peninsula, and likely elsewhere, a new study suggests.

  • Come Aboard: A Look at the R/V Marcus Langseth

    Come Aboard: A Look at the R/V Marcus Langseth

    A new video produced by Columbia University tells the story of what the research vessel Marcus G. Langseth is all about.

  • Mapping Land Claimed by Sea Level Rise

    Mapping Land Claimed by Sea Level Rise

    Understanding how coastal areas changed as the ocean rose in the past could help communities protect themselves from storm surge flooding in the future as the oceans warm and sea levels rise.

  • Imaging the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    Imaging the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    In the research expedition now underway, we will investigate the Juan de Fuca plate before it disappears under North America to understand why earthquakes happen where and when they do within the Cascadia subduction zone off the Pacific Northwest. Our ship, the R/V Marcus G. Langseth, is one of 25 research vessels available to U.S.…

  • Women Making Waves

    Women Making Waves

    There are quite a few graduate students aboard the Langseth but that isn’t anything out of the ordinary. What is a little unusual is that we’re all women, which is remarkable given the demographics of our field. Read on to find out why we’re proud to be making waves in the South Pacific and in…

  • Lucky 13 Gets Us 250,000 Years of Sediment

    Lucky 13 Gets Us 250,000 Years of Sediment

    We have been steaming and searching for locations on the seafloor where the sediments are accumulating undisturbed. We tried without luck to take cores at several promising locations, however the cores came up less than perfect. On our thirteenth core attempt of the cruise we got lucky.

Science for the Planet: In these short video explainers, discover how scientists and scholars across the Columbia Climate School are working to understand the effects of climate change and help solve the crisis.
  • Life Aboard the Langseth

    Life Aboard the Langseth

    Daily life on a research vessel is smaller and slower-paced — in a good way, for the most part.

  • Looking for the Origin of Slow Earthquakes in the Guerrero Gap

    Looking for the Origin of Slow Earthquakes in the Guerrero Gap

    We are underway on our 48-day long expedition offshore of the west coast of Mexico near Acapulco, where the young Cocos oceanic plate dives beneath the North American plate.

  • Lamont-Doherty Receives Donation of Marine Seismic Technology Upgrades

    Lamont-Doherty Receives Donation of Marine Seismic Technology Upgrades

    A generous donation from leading geoscience firm CGG Inc. will advance the research capacities of the Langseth research ship.

  • Ancient Faults & Water Are Sparking Earthquakes Off Alaska

    Ancient Faults & Water Are Sparking Earthquakes Off Alaska

    Ancient faults that formed in the ocean floor millions of years ago are feeding earthquakes today along stretches of the Alaska Peninsula, and likely elsewhere, a new study suggests.

  • Come Aboard: A Look at the R/V Marcus Langseth

    Come Aboard: A Look at the R/V Marcus Langseth

    A new video produced by Columbia University tells the story of what the research vessel Marcus G. Langseth is all about.

  • Mapping Land Claimed by Sea Level Rise

    Mapping Land Claimed by Sea Level Rise

    Understanding how coastal areas changed as the ocean rose in the past could help communities protect themselves from storm surge flooding in the future as the oceans warm and sea levels rise.

  • Imaging the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    Imaging the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    In the research expedition now underway, we will investigate the Juan de Fuca plate before it disappears under North America to understand why earthquakes happen where and when they do within the Cascadia subduction zone off the Pacific Northwest. Our ship, the R/V Marcus G. Langseth, is one of 25 research vessels available to U.S.…

  • Women Making Waves

    Women Making Waves

    There are quite a few graduate students aboard the Langseth but that isn’t anything out of the ordinary. What is a little unusual is that we’re all women, which is remarkable given the demographics of our field. Read on to find out why we’re proud to be making waves in the South Pacific and in…

  • Lucky 13 Gets Us 250,000 Years of Sediment

    Lucky 13 Gets Us 250,000 Years of Sediment

    We have been steaming and searching for locations on the seafloor where the sediments are accumulating undisturbed. We tried without luck to take cores at several promising locations, however the cores came up less than perfect. On our thirteenth core attempt of the cruise we got lucky.