News from the Columbia Climate School

Tag: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

  • Melting Ice and Rising Sea Levels: Why 2 Degrees Celsius Is Too High

    Melting Ice and Rising Sea Levels: Why 2 Degrees Celsius Is Too High

    At a United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change side event in early June, representatives from several countries discussed the urgent need to address global loss of water and sea-level rise.

  • Pasang Dolma Sherpa, Indigenous Peoples Representative to the U.N., Speaks With GlacierHub

    Pasang Dolma Sherpa, Indigenous Peoples Representative to the U.N., Speaks With GlacierHub

    Around the world, Indigenous communities are losing their lands, livelihoods and culture to climate change. Sherpa is fighting to bring their voices to the United Nations.

  • From Copenhagen to Paris: Likely to Fail Again?

    From Copenhagen to Paris: Likely to Fail Again?

    All of the pledges made in Paris will be voluntary. However, countries have not always fulfilled their pledges in the past, and it isn’t obvious that this agreement is going to cause countries to behave very differently in the future.

  • Under Pressure, a (Simulated) Climate Agreement

    Under Pressure, a (Simulated) Climate Agreement

    Coming up with an international climate agreement is hard work. But the students at the Make It Work simulated negotiations in Paris managed to find a way, though they left disagreeing over just how effective the pact would be.

  • Learning to Compromise

    Learning to Compromise

    After countless hours of workshopping, brainstorming, writing, and rewriting, I thought that a consensus between parties would not be so far off. However, with 220 opinions boiled down into 42 delegations, it was painfully difficult.

  • The Road to Make It Work

    The Road to Make It Work

    Students throughout Columbia University were notified of a once-in-a-lifetime chance to attend a student simulation in anticipation of the upcoming United Nations Climate Conference in Paris. Two words jumped out at me immediately: climate and Paris.

Science for the Planet: In these short video explainers, discover how scientists and scholars across the Columbia Climate School are working to understand the effects of climate change and help solve the crisis.
  • Melting Ice and Rising Sea Levels: Why 2 Degrees Celsius Is Too High

    Melting Ice and Rising Sea Levels: Why 2 Degrees Celsius Is Too High

    At a United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change side event in early June, representatives from several countries discussed the urgent need to address global loss of water and sea-level rise.

  • Pasang Dolma Sherpa, Indigenous Peoples Representative to the U.N., Speaks With GlacierHub

    Pasang Dolma Sherpa, Indigenous Peoples Representative to the U.N., Speaks With GlacierHub

    Around the world, Indigenous communities are losing their lands, livelihoods and culture to climate change. Sherpa is fighting to bring their voices to the United Nations.

  • From Copenhagen to Paris: Likely to Fail Again?

    From Copenhagen to Paris: Likely to Fail Again?

    All of the pledges made in Paris will be voluntary. However, countries have not always fulfilled their pledges in the past, and it isn’t obvious that this agreement is going to cause countries to behave very differently in the future.

  • Under Pressure, a (Simulated) Climate Agreement

    Under Pressure, a (Simulated) Climate Agreement

    Coming up with an international climate agreement is hard work. But the students at the Make It Work simulated negotiations in Paris managed to find a way, though they left disagreeing over just how effective the pact would be.

  • Learning to Compromise

    Learning to Compromise

    After countless hours of workshopping, brainstorming, writing, and rewriting, I thought that a consensus between parties would not be so far off. However, with 220 opinions boiled down into 42 delegations, it was painfully difficult.

  • The Road to Make It Work

    The Road to Make It Work

    Students throughout Columbia University were notified of a once-in-a-lifetime chance to attend a student simulation in anticipation of the upcoming United Nations Climate Conference in Paris. Two words jumped out at me immediately: climate and Paris.