State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

Vetlesen Prize

  • Vetlesen Prize Ceremony Honors Two Distinguished Researchers in Earth Sciences

    Vetlesen Prize Ceremony Honors Two Distinguished Researchers in Earth Sciences

    A celebration held at Columbia University recognized scientists Anny Cazenave and David Kohlstedt as the 2020 and 2023 Vetlesen Prize recipients.

  • Q&A With French Geophysicist and 2020 Vetlesen Prize Winner Anny Cazenave

    Q&A With French Geophysicist and 2020 Vetlesen Prize Winner Anny Cazenave

    For the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, world-renowned geophysicist Anny Cazenave discusses her research journey, the Vetlesen Prize, and her hopes for younger women scientists entering the field.

  • Explorer of Deep Earth Wins Vetlesen Prize

    Explorer of Deep Earth Wins Vetlesen Prize

    Using sophisticated equipment, David Kohlstedt has recreated the pressure, temperature and chemical conditions in the Earth’s mantle, which humans cannot observe directly. His findings have laid the basis for understanding many of the processes that drive the planet’s dynamics.

  • Pioneer in Charting Modern Sea Level Rise to Receive 2020 Vetlesen Prize

    Pioneer in Charting Modern Sea Level Rise to Receive 2020 Vetlesen Prize

    A scientist who has played a key role in documenting modern sea level rise and its causes is to receive the 2020 Vetlesen Prize for achievement in the earth sciences.

  • Webcast Today: Rich and Poor, and the Essence of El Niño

    Webcast Today: Rich and Poor, and the Essence of El Niño

    How does El Niño work, and how does it affect our climate, food supplies and water availability? The two men whose scientific work has been key to solving these puzzles will be honored Wednesday with the Vetlesen Prize, marking a major achievement in Earth sciences. And this afternoon, they’ll have something to say about it…

  • Columbia, Princeton Scientists Share 2017 Vetlesen Prize

    Columbia, Princeton Scientists Share 2017 Vetlesen Prize

    S. George Philander of Princeton University and Mark A. Cane of Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, who untangled the complex forces that drive El Niño, the world’s most powerful weather cycle, have won the 2017 Vetlesen Prize for achievement in earth sciences.

  • Vetlesen Science Prize Celebrated at Columbia Gala

    Vetlesen Science Prize Celebrated at Columbia Gala

    Stephen Sparks, one of the world’s foremost experts on volcanoes, received the Vetlesen Prize for his groundbreaking scientific work at a ceremony held June 24 at Columbia University. Two-hundred-fifty people attended the formal gathering in the Low Library Rotunda.

Banner featuring a collage of extreme heat images.

Recent record-breaking heat waves have affected communities across the world. The Extreme Heat Workshop will bring together researchers and practitioners to advance the state of knowledge, identify community needs, and develop a framework for evaluating risks with a focus on climate justice. Register by June 15

  • Vetlesen Prize Ceremony Honors Two Distinguished Researchers in Earth Sciences

    Vetlesen Prize Ceremony Honors Two Distinguished Researchers in Earth Sciences

    A celebration held at Columbia University recognized scientists Anny Cazenave and David Kohlstedt as the 2020 and 2023 Vetlesen Prize recipients.

  • Q&A With French Geophysicist and 2020 Vetlesen Prize Winner Anny Cazenave

    Q&A With French Geophysicist and 2020 Vetlesen Prize Winner Anny Cazenave

    For the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, world-renowned geophysicist Anny Cazenave discusses her research journey, the Vetlesen Prize, and her hopes for younger women scientists entering the field.

  • Explorer of Deep Earth Wins Vetlesen Prize

    Explorer of Deep Earth Wins Vetlesen Prize

    Using sophisticated equipment, David Kohlstedt has recreated the pressure, temperature and chemical conditions in the Earth’s mantle, which humans cannot observe directly. His findings have laid the basis for understanding many of the processes that drive the planet’s dynamics.

  • Pioneer in Charting Modern Sea Level Rise to Receive 2020 Vetlesen Prize

    Pioneer in Charting Modern Sea Level Rise to Receive 2020 Vetlesen Prize

    A scientist who has played a key role in documenting modern sea level rise and its causes is to receive the 2020 Vetlesen Prize for achievement in the earth sciences.

  • Webcast Today: Rich and Poor, and the Essence of El Niño

    Webcast Today: Rich and Poor, and the Essence of El Niño

    How does El Niño work, and how does it affect our climate, food supplies and water availability? The two men whose scientific work has been key to solving these puzzles will be honored Wednesday with the Vetlesen Prize, marking a major achievement in Earth sciences. And this afternoon, they’ll have something to say about it…

  • Columbia, Princeton Scientists Share 2017 Vetlesen Prize

    Columbia, Princeton Scientists Share 2017 Vetlesen Prize

    S. George Philander of Princeton University and Mark A. Cane of Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, who untangled the complex forces that drive El Niño, the world’s most powerful weather cycle, have won the 2017 Vetlesen Prize for achievement in earth sciences.

  • Vetlesen Science Prize Celebrated at Columbia Gala

    Vetlesen Science Prize Celebrated at Columbia Gala

    Stephen Sparks, one of the world’s foremost experts on volcanoes, received the Vetlesen Prize for his groundbreaking scientific work at a ceremony held June 24 at Columbia University. Two-hundred-fifty people attended the formal gathering in the Low Library Rotunda.