State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

Celestial Music

The new field of astroseismology provides new insight into stars' structure. Image: G. Perez, IAC, SMM
The field of astroseismology provides new insight into stars’ structure. Image: G. Perez, IAC, SMM

 

Did you ever watch stars, and hear distant singing?

New telescopes see that the galaxy’s ringing!

Listen now carefully, open your ears

To Johannes Kepler’s great “music of spheres.”

 

Celestial music, slight changes in brightness,

Give star-gazers feelings of joy and of lightness,

But even more thrilling is what we are learning,

Like what the deep cores of red giants are burning!

 

Formation of elements, galaxy nascence …

There’s no doubt about it:  we’ve got good vibrations!

 

 

__________________________________________________________

Further reading:

Kepler’s Surprise: The Sounds of the Stars, Cowen, Nature 2012

The Sun and the Stars: Giving Light to Dark Matter, Casanellas and Lopes, Modern Physics Letters A, 2014

This is one in a series of poems written by Katherine Allen, a researcher in geochemistry and paleoclimate at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences at Rutgers University. “Celestial Music” was first published on the author’s website in 2012.

 

Science for the Planet: In these short video explainers, discover how scientists and scholars across the Columbia Climate School are working to understand the effects of climate change and help solve the crisis.
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x