State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

Author: Kevin Krajick33

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  • Making Sense of Earth Data: A Guide

    Making Sense of Earth Data: A Guide

    Charts, graphs and maps representing natural phenomena can be a challenge to anyone trying to extract something meaningful from them. A new book, Earth Science Puzzles: Making Meaning From Data, aims to help students of earth and environmental sciences decode images by presenting practice puzzles consisting of real-world scientific data. The authors are Kim A. Kastens and Margie Turrin of…

  • Measuring Earthquakes in Western New York

    Measuring Earthquakes in Western New York

    Each year, dozens of small, mostly harmless earthquakes quakes rattle the northeastern United States and southern Canada, and one quite active area runs along the shores of lakes Erie and Ontario, in western New York. In order to learn more about what generates these, and the possible threat of something bigger, scientists at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth…

  • Beating Global Heat, But Only By Dumb Luck

    Beating Global Heat, But Only By Dumb Luck

    After sweltering in New York City’s record temperatures the last couple of months, I recently traveled to the Peruvian Amazon. Oy, I thought.  But instead of entering the mother of all sweat lodges, I found relief; for the most part, it was cooler in those tropical lowlands near the equator than outside my office at the corner of Broadway and 114th Street.…

  • Amazonians Have Shot at Reducing Greenhouse Gases, Says Study

    Amazonians Have Shot at Reducing Greenhouse Gases, Says Study

    The huge Brazilian Amazon state of Mato Grosso will cut its emissions of greenhouse gases by more than half if it sticks with current plans to reduce deforestation substantially by 2020, says a new study. The research, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, uses 105 years of historical data…

  • Earth Institute Scientists Drill Into the Oil Spill

    Earth Institute Scientists Drill Into the Oil Spill

    Earth Institute scientists have begun research into the Gulf oil spill’s physical and ecological impacts, both on land at sea. While much attention has focused on surface oil washing up along the shores of Gulf coast states, one cruise starting in mid-August will study the location and magnitude of subsurface oil plumes, and their effects…

  • Decline and Fall of a Glacier

    The glaciers around Puncak Jaya have long been in visible decline. From 1936 to 2006, they lost nearly 80 percent of their area–two-thirds of that since 1970, according to a new paper by glaciologist Michael Prentice of the Indiana Geological Survey, who has long been interested in the area. Satellite images show that from 2002 to 2006…

  • Getting Under the Surface

    With many questions still unanswered about the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, Earth Institute staff  have been providing perspective to the public and press on many aspects, from the spill’s magnitude and spread, to the technologies available to abate it, and its long-term policy implications.  Marine geophysicist Tim Crone was one of the first to openly question official estimates of the oil’s rate…

  • Gulf Oil Spill Resources

    Earth Institute researchers in many disciplines are studying the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, and are available to provide information and perspective to press. These include experts in regional seafloor geology; technology of deepwater drilling and spill control; measurement of spill flow; potential movements via underwater or surface currents; possible biological effects; potential effects of…

  • Scouting the Glacier

    Team members are now actively scouting by foot on Puncak Jaya, looking for the best drill spots, travel routes  and campsites. The man in red is Broxton Bird of Ohio State University. In brown, the appropriately named alpine veteran Keith Mountain of  the University of Louisville. At bottom: team leaders Dwi Susanto and Lonnie Thompson give a…

  • Making Sense of Earth Data: A Guide

    Making Sense of Earth Data: A Guide

    Charts, graphs and maps representing natural phenomena can be a challenge to anyone trying to extract something meaningful from them. A new book, Earth Science Puzzles: Making Meaning From Data, aims to help students of earth and environmental sciences decode images by presenting practice puzzles consisting of real-world scientific data. The authors are Kim A. Kastens and Margie Turrin of…

  • Measuring Earthquakes in Western New York

    Measuring Earthquakes in Western New York

    Each year, dozens of small, mostly harmless earthquakes quakes rattle the northeastern United States and southern Canada, and one quite active area runs along the shores of lakes Erie and Ontario, in western New York. In order to learn more about what generates these, and the possible threat of something bigger, scientists at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth…

  • Beating Global Heat, But Only By Dumb Luck

    Beating Global Heat, But Only By Dumb Luck

    After sweltering in New York City’s record temperatures the last couple of months, I recently traveled to the Peruvian Amazon. Oy, I thought.  But instead of entering the mother of all sweat lodges, I found relief; for the most part, it was cooler in those tropical lowlands near the equator than outside my office at the corner of Broadway and 114th Street.…

  • Amazonians Have Shot at Reducing Greenhouse Gases, Says Study

    Amazonians Have Shot at Reducing Greenhouse Gases, Says Study

    The huge Brazilian Amazon state of Mato Grosso will cut its emissions of greenhouse gases by more than half if it sticks with current plans to reduce deforestation substantially by 2020, says a new study. The research, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, uses 105 years of historical data…

  • Earth Institute Scientists Drill Into the Oil Spill

    Earth Institute Scientists Drill Into the Oil Spill

    Earth Institute scientists have begun research into the Gulf oil spill’s physical and ecological impacts, both on land at sea. While much attention has focused on surface oil washing up along the shores of Gulf coast states, one cruise starting in mid-August will study the location and magnitude of subsurface oil plumes, and their effects…

  • Decline and Fall of a Glacier

    The glaciers around Puncak Jaya have long been in visible decline. From 1936 to 2006, they lost nearly 80 percent of their area–two-thirds of that since 1970, according to a new paper by glaciologist Michael Prentice of the Indiana Geological Survey, who has long been interested in the area. Satellite images show that from 2002 to 2006…

  • Getting Under the Surface

    With many questions still unanswered about the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, Earth Institute staff  have been providing perspective to the public and press on many aspects, from the spill’s magnitude and spread, to the technologies available to abate it, and its long-term policy implications.  Marine geophysicist Tim Crone was one of the first to openly question official estimates of the oil’s rate…

  • Gulf Oil Spill Resources

    Earth Institute researchers in many disciplines are studying the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, and are available to provide information and perspective to press. These include experts in regional seafloor geology; technology of deepwater drilling and spill control; measurement of spill flow; potential movements via underwater or surface currents; possible biological effects; potential effects of…

  • Scouting the Glacier

    Team members are now actively scouting by foot on Puncak Jaya, looking for the best drill spots, travel routes  and campsites. The man in red is Broxton Bird of Ohio State University. In brown, the appropriately named alpine veteran Keith Mountain of  the University of Louisville. At bottom: team leaders Dwi Susanto and Lonnie Thompson give a…