State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

Earth Sciences135

  • Pole of Inaccessibility

    Hidden beneath 2.5 miles of ice, the Gamburtsev Mountains in eastern Antarctica are the most mysterious peaks on Earth. Michael Studinger, a scientist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, helped lead a recent expedition to map these invisible mountains using geophysical instruments. He will speak this Sunday about his trip. He answers a few questions here: Q:…

  • Foot Forward

    In 1968,¬†14-year-old Paul Olsen of suburban Livingston, N.J., and his¬†friend Tony Lessa heard that dinosaur tracks had been¬†found¬†in a nearby quarry. They raced over on their bikes.¬†¬†“I went ballistic,” Olsen recalls. Over the next few years, the boys uncovered and studied thousands of tracks and other fossils there, often working into the night.¬†¬†It opened the…

Columbia campus skyline with text Columbia Climate School Class Day 2024 - Congratulations Graduates

Congratulations to our Columbia Climate School MA in Climate & Society Class of 2024! Learn about our May 10 Class Day celebration. #ColumbiaClimate2024

  • Pole of Inaccessibility

    Hidden beneath 2.5 miles of ice, the Gamburtsev Mountains in eastern Antarctica are the most mysterious peaks on Earth. Michael Studinger, a scientist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, helped lead a recent expedition to map these invisible mountains using geophysical instruments. He will speak this Sunday about his trip. He answers a few questions here: Q:…

  • Foot Forward

    In 1968,¬†14-year-old Paul Olsen of suburban Livingston, N.J., and his¬†friend Tony Lessa heard that dinosaur tracks had been¬†found¬†in a nearby quarry. They raced over on their bikes.¬†¬†“I went ballistic,” Olsen recalls. Over the next few years, the boys uncovered and studied thousands of tracks and other fossils there, often working into the night.¬†¬†It opened the…