State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

carbon storage3

  • American Geophysical Union 2018: Key Events From the Earth Institute

    American Geophysical Union 2018: Key Events From the Earth Institute

    The American Geophysical Union fall meeting takes place Dec. 10-14 in Washington, D.C. Here is a guide to key talks and other events from Columbia’s Earth Institute.

  • Can Soil Help Combat Climate Change?

    Can Soil Help Combat Climate Change?

    Soil naturally absorbs a huge amount of carbon. Some scientists think we can use it to our advantage in the fight against global warming.

  • Developing Carbon Management Solutions

    Developing Carbon Management Solutions

    David Goldberg and Peter Kelemen, scientists at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, are at the forefront of carbon capture and storage research. In this video, they discuss their work and how it will contribute to carbon management solutions and strengthen society’s resilience to climate change.

  • Watch Live: Turning CO2 to Stone, Scientists Discuss a Climate Solution

    Watch Live: Turning CO2 to Stone, Scientists Discuss a Climate Solution

    On June 24, a scientist involved in the CarbFix carbon capture and storage project in Iceland will give a live-streamed presentation about the technology and the project’s success at turning CO2 to stone.

  • The Carbon Vault

    The Carbon Vault

    The skin of the Earth is the color of tar, Ridged, freshly healed like the seams of a scar. Through salt-spattered sky, a gray-winged gull sails; Steam gently rises, the island exhales.

  • In a Melting Iceland, Drilling Deep to Stem Climate Change

    In a Melting Iceland, Drilling Deep to Stem Climate Change

    Iceland is pioneering a new technology to deal with climate change. Its Hellisheidi geothermal power plant, the world’s largest, hosts arguably the world’s most advanced program to capture and lock away globe-warming carbon dioxide.

  • Photo Essay: Iceland at the Cutting Edge of Climate Change

    Photo Essay: Iceland at the Cutting Edge of Climate Change

    Iceland has a complicated relationship with climate change. As in much of the far north, global warming is already exerting many effects here–arguably both good and bad. Yet the country contributes relatively little to the warming, since most of its energy comes from geothermal and hydro plants, which produce little carbon dioxide. Now, it is…

  • Alma Mater’s Other Secret: a Way Forward on Climate

    Alma Mater’s Other Secret: a Way Forward on Climate

    Sitting on the iconic front steps of Low Library, Alma Mater rests on a plinth that offers a clue to a possible method of carbon sequestration, a vital technology for addressing our problem of too much CO2.

  • Solving the Mysteries of Carbon Dioxide

    Solving the Mysteries of Carbon Dioxide

    About 50 percent of the CO2 produced by human activity remains in the atmosphere, warming the planet. But scientists don’t know where and how oceans and plants have absorbed the rest of the manmade CO2. To try to answer these questions, on July 2, 2014, NASA launched the $468 million Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2), its…

Banner featuring a collage of extreme heat images.

Recent record-breaking heat waves have affected communities across the world. The Extreme Heat Workshop will bring together researchers and practitioners to advance the state of knowledge, identify community needs, and develop a framework for evaluating risks with a focus on climate justice. Register by June 15

  • American Geophysical Union 2018: Key Events From the Earth Institute

    American Geophysical Union 2018: Key Events From the Earth Institute

    The American Geophysical Union fall meeting takes place Dec. 10-14 in Washington, D.C. Here is a guide to key talks and other events from Columbia’s Earth Institute.

  • Can Soil Help Combat Climate Change?

    Can Soil Help Combat Climate Change?

    Soil naturally absorbs a huge amount of carbon. Some scientists think we can use it to our advantage in the fight against global warming.

  • Developing Carbon Management Solutions

    Developing Carbon Management Solutions

    David Goldberg and Peter Kelemen, scientists at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, are at the forefront of carbon capture and storage research. In this video, they discuss their work and how it will contribute to carbon management solutions and strengthen society’s resilience to climate change.

  • Watch Live: Turning CO2 to Stone, Scientists Discuss a Climate Solution

    Watch Live: Turning CO2 to Stone, Scientists Discuss a Climate Solution

    On June 24, a scientist involved in the CarbFix carbon capture and storage project in Iceland will give a live-streamed presentation about the technology and the project’s success at turning CO2 to stone.

  • The Carbon Vault

    The Carbon Vault

    The skin of the Earth is the color of tar, Ridged, freshly healed like the seams of a scar. Through salt-spattered sky, a gray-winged gull sails; Steam gently rises, the island exhales.

  • In a Melting Iceland, Drilling Deep to Stem Climate Change

    In a Melting Iceland, Drilling Deep to Stem Climate Change

    Iceland is pioneering a new technology to deal with climate change. Its Hellisheidi geothermal power plant, the world’s largest, hosts arguably the world’s most advanced program to capture and lock away globe-warming carbon dioxide.

  • Photo Essay: Iceland at the Cutting Edge of Climate Change

    Photo Essay: Iceland at the Cutting Edge of Climate Change

    Iceland has a complicated relationship with climate change. As in much of the far north, global warming is already exerting many effects here–arguably both good and bad. Yet the country contributes relatively little to the warming, since most of its energy comes from geothermal and hydro plants, which produce little carbon dioxide. Now, it is…

  • Alma Mater’s Other Secret: a Way Forward on Climate

    Alma Mater’s Other Secret: a Way Forward on Climate

    Sitting on the iconic front steps of Low Library, Alma Mater rests on a plinth that offers a clue to a possible method of carbon sequestration, a vital technology for addressing our problem of too much CO2.

  • Solving the Mysteries of Carbon Dioxide

    Solving the Mysteries of Carbon Dioxide

    About 50 percent of the CO2 produced by human activity remains in the atmosphere, warming the planet. But scientists don’t know where and how oceans and plants have absorbed the rest of the manmade CO2. To try to answer these questions, on July 2, 2014, NASA launched the $468 million Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2), its…