News from the Columbia Climate School

Tag: Chile2

  • Water Samples Reveal Microplastics in Remote Patagonian Fjord System

    Water Samples Reveal Microplastics in Remote Patagonian Fjord System

    Microscopic bits of plastic have been discovered in remote pristine Chilean Patagonia, with implications for ecosystem and human health.

  • National Parks in Argentina: Scenery or Sovereignty?

    National Parks in Argentina: Scenery or Sovereignty?

    A new study traces the political and economic forces that led to the creation and development of Los Glaciares National Park in Patagonia.

  • Chilean Organization Hopes to Write Glacier Protection Into Chile’s New Constitution

    Chilean Organization Hopes to Write Glacier Protection Into Chile’s New Constitution

    Fundación Glaciares Chilenos is working to fill a gaping hole in Chilean environmental policy.

  • Ancient Peoples in Patagonia Who Adapted to Changing Climate Offer Insights for Today

    Ancient Peoples in Patagonia Who Adapted to Changing Climate Offer Insights for Today

    Fish bones reveal the seasonal fishing patterns of Patagonians thousands of years ago, illustrating how prehistoric communities adapted to their environments.

  • Walking in the Shadow of a Great Volcano

    Walking in the Shadow of a Great Volcano

    On a ledge just inside the lip of Chile’s Quizapu volcanic crater, Philipp Ruprecht was furiously digging a trench. Here at an elevation of 10,000 feet, a 1,000-foot plunge loomed just yards away, and wind was whipping dust off his shovel. But the volcanologist was excited. Ruprecht had just found this spot, topped with undisturbed…

  • Photo Essay: In the Shadow of a Great Volcano

    Photo Essay: In the Shadow of a Great Volcano

    High in the southern Andes, Chile’s Quizapu crater is one of South America’s most fearsome geologic features. In 1846, it was the source of one the continent’s largest historically recorded lava flows. In 1932, it produced one of the largest recorded volcanic blasts. The volcano is currently inactive, but could revive at any time. What…

  • Peering into Chile’s Quizapu Volcano

    Peering into Chile’s Quizapu Volcano

    In their quest to unravel the physical and chemical processes controlling volcanic eruptions, Einat Lev and colleagues headed to South America and the volcanoes of Chile.

  • Managing Water in a Dry Land

    Managing Water in a Dry Land

    Since 2010, the Earth Institute’s International Research Institute for Climate and Society along with UNESCO and their colleagues in Chile have been working with Elqui’s water authority to help them use seasonal forecasts as way to better allocate water and prepare for droughts.

Science for the Planet: In these short video explainers, discover how scientists and scholars across the Columbia Climate School are working to understand the effects of climate change and help solve the crisis.
  • Water Samples Reveal Microplastics in Remote Patagonian Fjord System

    Water Samples Reveal Microplastics in Remote Patagonian Fjord System

    Microscopic bits of plastic have been discovered in remote pristine Chilean Patagonia, with implications for ecosystem and human health.

  • National Parks in Argentina: Scenery or Sovereignty?

    National Parks in Argentina: Scenery or Sovereignty?

    A new study traces the political and economic forces that led to the creation and development of Los Glaciares National Park in Patagonia.

  • Chilean Organization Hopes to Write Glacier Protection Into Chile’s New Constitution

    Chilean Organization Hopes to Write Glacier Protection Into Chile’s New Constitution

    Fundación Glaciares Chilenos is working to fill a gaping hole in Chilean environmental policy.

  • Ancient Peoples in Patagonia Who Adapted to Changing Climate Offer Insights for Today

    Ancient Peoples in Patagonia Who Adapted to Changing Climate Offer Insights for Today

    Fish bones reveal the seasonal fishing patterns of Patagonians thousands of years ago, illustrating how prehistoric communities adapted to their environments.

  • Walking in the Shadow of a Great Volcano

    Walking in the Shadow of a Great Volcano

    On a ledge just inside the lip of Chile’s Quizapu volcanic crater, Philipp Ruprecht was furiously digging a trench. Here at an elevation of 10,000 feet, a 1,000-foot plunge loomed just yards away, and wind was whipping dust off his shovel. But the volcanologist was excited. Ruprecht had just found this spot, topped with undisturbed…

  • Photo Essay: In the Shadow of a Great Volcano

    Photo Essay: In the Shadow of a Great Volcano

    High in the southern Andes, Chile’s Quizapu crater is one of South America’s most fearsome geologic features. In 1846, it was the source of one the continent’s largest historically recorded lava flows. In 1932, it produced one of the largest recorded volcanic blasts. The volcano is currently inactive, but could revive at any time. What…

  • Peering into Chile’s Quizapu Volcano

    Peering into Chile’s Quizapu Volcano

    In their quest to unravel the physical and chemical processes controlling volcanic eruptions, Einat Lev and colleagues headed to South America and the volcanoes of Chile.

  • Managing Water in a Dry Land

    Managing Water in a Dry Land

    Since 2010, the Earth Institute’s International Research Institute for Climate and Society along with UNESCO and their colleagues in Chile have been working with Elqui’s water authority to help them use seasonal forecasts as way to better allocate water and prepare for droughts.