News from the Columbia Climate School

Tag: Hurricane Sandy2

  • When Is a Sea Wall a Good Idea?

    When Is a Sea Wall a Good Idea?

    Scientists at Columbia’s Earth Institute are using simulations to test how well different methods protect coastal areas from hurricanes and sea level rise.

  • Understanding Climate Change: Long Beach New York, Post-Sandy

    Understanding Climate Change: Long Beach New York, Post-Sandy

    People in Long Beach have experienced the impact of climate change and are doing what they can to prepare for future floods. Sandy changed local attitudes toward measures designed to build climate resilience.

  • Vulnerabilities of a Coastal City: Reflections Five Years After Hurricane Sandy

    Vulnerabilities of a Coastal City: Reflections Five Years After Hurricane Sandy

    A student shares her first-hand experience of the devastating storm, and discusses how New York City is building resilience—and how it could do better.

  • New York Is Still Feeling the Effects of Hurricane Sandy, Five Years Later

    New York Is Still Feeling the Effects of Hurricane Sandy, Five Years Later

    In October 2012, Sandy devastated large swaths of the city with floods and fire. How well have we recovered? And will we be ready for the next big storm?

  • How Superstorm Sandy Inspired an Award-Winning Book

    How Superstorm Sandy Inspired an Award-Winning Book

    “A lot of the challenge is understanding what we as a species should do, because the disasters are getting more prevalent. In the last hundred years, both in human and financial costs, damages are skyrocketing. Most of that is just more people living in dangerous places, but climate change will be more of a factor…

  • New York, New Orleans, Charlottetown and Everywhere Else

    New York, New Orleans, Charlottetown and Everywhere Else

    The disaster in New Orleans was almost uniquely awful in modern American history. But even if Katrina isn’t likely to happen everywhere, something can happen almost anywhere—including, we now know, New York. And further to the north and east.

  • The Disaster Profiteers

    The Disaster Profiteers

    In his new book “The Disaster Profiteers,” Earth Institute professor John Mutter argues that natural disasters are bad for the poor–and can be great for the rich, who often seize resources meant for recovery, when no one is looking.

  • Post-Sandy Rebuilding for Resiliency: Lessons From Long Beach, NY

    It is not that people have gotten amnesia and don’t remember the damage of Hurricane Sandy. Some homes are still being rebuilt and some people are still displaced. Moreover, the people who lead the shore towns in Long Island and New Jersey are speaking the language of climate resiliency.

  • Was Hurricane Sandy the 100-Year Event?

    Was Hurricane Sandy the 100-Year Event?

    Recent research suggests that Sandy may have been much more likely than previously believed.

Science for the Planet: In these short video explainers, discover how scientists and scholars across the Columbia Climate School are working to understand the effects of climate change and help solve the crisis.
  • When Is a Sea Wall a Good Idea?

    When Is a Sea Wall a Good Idea?

    Scientists at Columbia’s Earth Institute are using simulations to test how well different methods protect coastal areas from hurricanes and sea level rise.

  • Understanding Climate Change: Long Beach New York, Post-Sandy

    Understanding Climate Change: Long Beach New York, Post-Sandy

    People in Long Beach have experienced the impact of climate change and are doing what they can to prepare for future floods. Sandy changed local attitudes toward measures designed to build climate resilience.

  • Vulnerabilities of a Coastal City: Reflections Five Years After Hurricane Sandy

    Vulnerabilities of a Coastal City: Reflections Five Years After Hurricane Sandy

    A student shares her first-hand experience of the devastating storm, and discusses how New York City is building resilience—and how it could do better.

  • New York Is Still Feeling the Effects of Hurricane Sandy, Five Years Later

    New York Is Still Feeling the Effects of Hurricane Sandy, Five Years Later

    In October 2012, Sandy devastated large swaths of the city with floods and fire. How well have we recovered? And will we be ready for the next big storm?

  • How Superstorm Sandy Inspired an Award-Winning Book

    How Superstorm Sandy Inspired an Award-Winning Book

    “A lot of the challenge is understanding what we as a species should do, because the disasters are getting more prevalent. In the last hundred years, both in human and financial costs, damages are skyrocketing. Most of that is just more people living in dangerous places, but climate change will be more of a factor…

  • New York, New Orleans, Charlottetown and Everywhere Else

    New York, New Orleans, Charlottetown and Everywhere Else

    The disaster in New Orleans was almost uniquely awful in modern American history. But even if Katrina isn’t likely to happen everywhere, something can happen almost anywhere—including, we now know, New York. And further to the north and east.

  • The Disaster Profiteers

    The Disaster Profiteers

    In his new book “The Disaster Profiteers,” Earth Institute professor John Mutter argues that natural disasters are bad for the poor–and can be great for the rich, who often seize resources meant for recovery, when no one is looking.

  • Post-Sandy Rebuilding for Resiliency: Lessons From Long Beach, NY

    It is not that people have gotten amnesia and don’t remember the damage of Hurricane Sandy. Some homes are still being rebuilt and some people are still displaced. Moreover, the people who lead the shore towns in Long Island and New Jersey are speaking the language of climate resiliency.

  • Was Hurricane Sandy the 100-Year Event?

    Was Hurricane Sandy the 100-Year Event?

    Recent research suggests that Sandy may have been much more likely than previously believed.