State of the Planet

News from the Columbia Climate School

natural hazards

  • A Slow-Motion Section of the San Andreas Fault May Not Be So Harmless After All

    A Slow-Motion Section of the San Andreas Fault May Not Be So Harmless After All

    The central section of the great fault spanning California, thought to be creeping along harmlessly at the moment, has experienced big quakes in the past, says a new study.

  • Double Trouble: The Importance of Thinking About Compound Risk

    Double Trouble: The Importance of Thinking About Compound Risk

    Compound risk — when multiple risks occur simultaneously, or one after another — was the topic of a recent discussion as part of the Resilience Media Project, a part of the Initiative on Communication and Sustainability at the Earth Institute.

  • How Juneau, Alaska Responds to Yearly Glacier Floods

    How Juneau, Alaska Responds to Yearly Glacier Floods

    Glacial flooding is never predictable, but Juneau’s response has become reliably routine, thanks to scientific research and partnerships with government.

  • New Images From Under Alaska Seafloor Suggest High Tsunami Danger

    New Images From Under Alaska Seafloor Suggest High Tsunami Danger

    Scientists probing under the seafloor off Alaska have mapped a geologic structure that they say signals potential for a major tsunami in an area that normally would be considered benign.

  • Disaster Experts: A Journalist’s Guide

    Disaster Experts: A Journalist’s Guide

    An all-purpose guide for journalists covering disasters, natural and manmade.

  • Lamont to Develop New Earthquake and Tsunami Warning System

    Lamont to Develop New Earthquake and Tsunami Warning System

    A new pilot program led by the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory aims to provide earlier and more accurate warnings of damaging ground-shaking from earthquakes and the imminent arrival of tsunamis.

  • The Coming Great Quakes in India and Bangladesh?

    The Coming Great Quakes in India and Bangladesh?

    A new film takes viewers from the eastern highlands of India to the booming lowland metropolis of Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh–and explores an ever-more detailed picture of catastrophic earthquake threat that scientists are discovering under the region.

  • Walking in the Shadow of a Great Volcano

    Walking in the Shadow of a Great Volcano

    On a ledge just inside the lip of Chile’s Quizapu volcanic crater, Philipp Ruprecht was furiously digging a trench. Here at an elevation of 10,000 feet, a 1,000-foot plunge loomed just yards away, and wind was whipping dust off his shovel. But the volcanologist was excited. Ruprecht had just found this spot, topped with undisturbed…

  • Photo Essay: In the Shadow of a Great Volcano

    Photo Essay: In the Shadow of a Great Volcano

    High in the southern Andes, Chile’s Quizapu crater is one of South America’s most fearsome geologic features. In 1846, it was the source of one the continent’s largest historically recorded lava flows. In 1932, it produced one of the largest recorded volcanic blasts. The volcano is currently inactive, but could revive at any time. What…

Banner featuring a collage of extreme heat images.

Recent record-breaking heat waves have affected communities across the world. The Extreme Heat Workshop will bring together researchers and practitioners to advance the state of knowledge, identify community needs, and develop a framework for evaluating risks with a focus on climate justice. Register by June 15

  • A Slow-Motion Section of the San Andreas Fault May Not Be So Harmless After All

    A Slow-Motion Section of the San Andreas Fault May Not Be So Harmless After All

    The central section of the great fault spanning California, thought to be creeping along harmlessly at the moment, has experienced big quakes in the past, says a new study.

  • Double Trouble: The Importance of Thinking About Compound Risk

    Double Trouble: The Importance of Thinking About Compound Risk

    Compound risk — when multiple risks occur simultaneously, or one after another — was the topic of a recent discussion as part of the Resilience Media Project, a part of the Initiative on Communication and Sustainability at the Earth Institute.

  • How Juneau, Alaska Responds to Yearly Glacier Floods

    How Juneau, Alaska Responds to Yearly Glacier Floods

    Glacial flooding is never predictable, but Juneau’s response has become reliably routine, thanks to scientific research and partnerships with government.

  • New Images From Under Alaska Seafloor Suggest High Tsunami Danger

    New Images From Under Alaska Seafloor Suggest High Tsunami Danger

    Scientists probing under the seafloor off Alaska have mapped a geologic structure that they say signals potential for a major tsunami in an area that normally would be considered benign.

  • Disaster Experts: A Journalist’s Guide

    Disaster Experts: A Journalist’s Guide

    An all-purpose guide for journalists covering disasters, natural and manmade.

  • Lamont to Develop New Earthquake and Tsunami Warning System

    Lamont to Develop New Earthquake and Tsunami Warning System

    A new pilot program led by the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory aims to provide earlier and more accurate warnings of damaging ground-shaking from earthquakes and the imminent arrival of tsunamis.

  • The Coming Great Quakes in India and Bangladesh?

    The Coming Great Quakes in India and Bangladesh?

    A new film takes viewers from the eastern highlands of India to the booming lowland metropolis of Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh–and explores an ever-more detailed picture of catastrophic earthquake threat that scientists are discovering under the region.

  • Walking in the Shadow of a Great Volcano

    Walking in the Shadow of a Great Volcano

    On a ledge just inside the lip of Chile’s Quizapu volcanic crater, Philipp Ruprecht was furiously digging a trench. Here at an elevation of 10,000 feet, a 1,000-foot plunge loomed just yards away, and wind was whipping dust off his shovel. But the volcanologist was excited. Ruprecht had just found this spot, topped with undisturbed…

  • Photo Essay: In the Shadow of a Great Volcano

    Photo Essay: In the Shadow of a Great Volcano

    High in the southern Andes, Chile’s Quizapu crater is one of South America’s most fearsome geologic features. In 1846, it was the source of one the continent’s largest historically recorded lava flows. In 1932, it produced one of the largest recorded volcanic blasts. The volcano is currently inactive, but could revive at any time. What…