Earth Sciences Archives - Page 2 of 118 - State of the Planet

Otters the Size of Lions Once Roamed the Earth

Enhydriodon omoensis dwarfed ancestors of humans who lived alongside it from 2.5 to 3.5 million years ago; the two species may have competed for food.

by |September 6, 2022

Scientists Say a Shipwreck Off Patagonia Is a Long-Lost 1850s Rhode Island Whaler

In 1858, a sailing ship left Warren, R.I., to hunt the globe for whales, and never returned. Where did it end up? Researchers from the southern and northern hemispheres joined to investigate.

by |August 24, 2022

Científicos afirman que un naufragio en la costa de Patagonia es un ballenero norteamericano perdido en 1859

En 1858, un velero partió de una ciudad costera del noreste de Estados Unidos para cazar ballenas alrededor del mundo y nunca regresó. ¿Dónde terminó? Investigadores de los hemisferios sur y norte se unieron para dar respuesta a este misterio.

by |August 24, 2022
Caroline Juang profile picture

Caroline Juang: Blending Art, Science, and Outreach

In addition to studying climate-related hazards, Juang is a talented artist who helps make STEM fields more accessible for underrepresented minorities. Somehow, she also finds time to sleep.

by Alexis Earl |August 24, 2022

17 Million-Year-Old Teeth Open Windows Into Early Ape and Human Evolution

A new study shows that natural variants of oxygen within ancient animal teeth recorded details of seasonal rainfall, environmental conditions and animal behavior.

by |August 22, 2022
two people with weather balloon and sonde

Is Air Pollution Fueling Stronger Thunderstorms? Project Aims to Find Out

In Houston, researchers are studying how air pollution particles affect the strength and lifecycle of storms in order to improve weather and climate forecasting.

by |August 17, 2022

Balancing Act: Can Precariously Perched Boulders Signal New York’s Earthquake Risk?

Long ago, melting glaciers dropped giant boulders onto surfaces in the New York City exurbs, and many seem to remain in their original, delicately balanced positions. Can they be used to judge the maximum sizes of past earthquakes?

by |July 21, 2022

More Frequent European Heat Waves Linked to Changes in Jet Stream

A new study shows that weather systems that normally cool part of the continent are being diverted northward. This is combining with overall warming to produce long-lived heat waves.

by |July 5, 2022

Dinosaurs Took Over Amid Ice, Not Warmth, Says a New Study of Ancient Mass Extinction

There is new evidence that ancient high latitudes, to which early dinosaurs were largely relegated, regularly froze over, and that the creatures adapted—an apparent key to their later dominance.

by |July 1, 2022

Seeing Through the Sea

How researchers are plumbing the seafloor during a quest to understand ‘silent’ earthquakes off the Mexican coast.

by Brian Boston |June 27, 2022